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Caring for a Three Legged Dog or Cat

Tripawds is the place to learn how to care for a three legged dog or cat, with answers about dog leg amputation, and cat amputation recovery from many years of member experiences.
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non-surgical solid tumor treatment option
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Forum Posts: 14
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3 July 2020 - 3:34 pm
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I posted about this product about a year ago but wanted to follow up as they have had more experience with it and it appears to be a treatment that can avoid amputation.  A company (Vivos) has developed a material into which they infuse Yi-90 (A radioactive material that decays very quickly and with high energy).  At room temperature the material is a liquid that they can put into a syringe.  When injected into a warm body it solidifies in place.  Meaning they can inject a radioactive material into a tumor and it will stay in place and kill the cancer without harming surrounding tissue.  They have treated a half dozen or so dogs and cats.  All treatments significantly reduced tumor size. A few of the dogs have had second treatments when it was noticed the tumor had returned (from this they have learned better approaches for planning where to inject the material).  But most just have single treatment, stay the night at the vet, then go home with the owner for no further treatment except followup appointments. 

It is not like radiation treatment from a machine that works in low doses and has to be repeated many times over a long period.  Its a megadose of high energy radiation that doesn’t emit far but where it does emit is lethal to cancer.  A sheet of syran wrap or latex glove will protect a person from it so it doesn’t require hazmat suits for either the doctor or patient.  The only side affect so far has been ulceration of tissue because of the speed with which the radioactive tissue is killed that has to be managed to insure infection doesn’t set in. Treatment is very expensive.  In fact, I would call it prohibitively expensive.  But the company has started subsidizing treatment (I don’t know to what extent) because they want to generate data to convince the FDA to let them begin human trials.  

They tweeted about their latest patient  (

) this morning.  I sure hope they can save the little dogs leg, but mostly I’m glad that the tumor has been treated and the cancer is dying.  Each dot on the tumor corresponds to where they injected the IsoPet (what they call their product).  I expect they will be sharing information about this patient in the future.  Only one of the other dog owners who got treated shared information on their treatment experience.  That dog has not had its cancer return and is doing great two years out (https://www.fac…..221/posts/).  Its tumor was much smaller than the one recently treated (maybe walnut sized).  

If your pet has a solid tumor that an injection can access (i.e. relatively close to surface of skin) and you live near Eastern Wa Washington or Kansas City Mo it may be worth checking with the company.  They are especially interested in being able to treat tumors before any surgery is performed (all dogs treated so far have had surgery(s) which failed and the tumor came back before owner resorted to radiogel) to illustrate it is a viable and in some cases preferred treatment over surgery (because it can be put exactly where tumor is regardless of how close that area is to other healthy tissue).  Because of that I think that cases that have not yet had surgery would have a higher likely-hood of being selected to be done under subsidy.  

The Rainbow Bridge



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3 July 2020 - 6:50 pm
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Oooh I remember this! You posted about it in Tips and Resources! I will share this link over there.

We were supposed to meet with one of the vets in Washington who is pioneering this treatment with clients, but didn’t have a chance to visit when we were out that way. Thank you for reminding us about it. I may reach out to her again.

How are you doing these days? Has Nyaya sent you any messages from the Rainbow Bridge

It's better to hop on three legs than to limp on four.™
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4 July 2020 - 8:15 am
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I’m doing well.  No messages from Nyaya, but I think of her all the time.  I miss her terribly, but not the sad missing that hurts anymore, its settled into a little ache there to remind me what a wonderful dog she was and the joy she brought me.  Maybe that little ache are the messages from her. 

She did amazingly well with three legs for over 14 years, but her latter years were far far harder and more painful than if she had been able to keep her leg.  I wouldn’t risk a dogs life to save a leg because they do so well (and putting a pet down for this reason shouldn’t be allowed!!!!!), but if it were possible for a pet to keep a leg without any additional risk to its health it would be a good thing.    When I learned Nyaya had to lose her leg I just rolled with it and did whatever I needed to do to help her.  But in looking back on it, there was a lot to figure out and work around.  Not just when it happened, but over her entire life.  In fact it was so much stuff I think it could keep a website busy and be developed into a  book :).  

The Rainbow Bridge



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4 July 2020 - 4:00 pm
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Aww yeah, our furkids never leave our hearts, ever. I’m glad you can smile when you think of the time you had together.

I understand completely your point about Nya’s life on three legs. We are discovering the same with Wyatt Ray , now that he is 11. So much has changed for the better about helping a Tripawd improve quality of life, like the development of rehab therapy and prosthetics , but not even a prosthesis can take the place of a working spare leg. We see the effects on Wyatt and are sharing what we learn so that more older Tripawds can have a good quality of life. You do what you can do, stay educated about options and make the most of the time you have together right? 

We would love to interview you about Nyaya’s life if you’re feeling up to it. Private message me if so. 

(((hugs)))

It's better to hop on three legs than to limp on four.™
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