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Caring for a Three Legged Dog or Cat

Tripawds is the place to learn how to care for a three legged dog or cat, with answers about dog leg amputation, and cat amputation recovery from many years of member experiences.
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Introducing Roostar AKA ASBO
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ribbons
1
1 December 2013 - 7:52 am
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Ok, first of all, Roo is a quad pod. I felt the need to make that confession because I didnt want anybody to think I snuck in with my 4 legged dog, passing him off as a tri-pod.

This font has its own mind and keeps changing so if I get past moderation I think I will take the path of least resistance in future and plump for boring black….Now I will have to write with no new paragraphs so take a breath in the appropriate places for me.

Roostar was born on a welsh puppy farm and was rejected because he is disabled. The rescue centre he was sent to at a tiny 6 weeks took him to an orthopaedic surgeon who took xrays and gave him the prognosis of amputation of his spastic (that is the correct term)  hind left at 6 months of age, as this was considered the earliest age that his body would be sufficiently developed to cope as a tripod. I travelled from London to Wales to collect him age about 7 weeks and saw a different story. Two years previous I had adopted two pups with what *might* have been shwimmers disease but while others talked of wheelchairs, I talked of physio. You cant learn to walk in a wheelchair and my girls were running inside 3 months (more on that later). I took one look at Roo and said “Thats a functioning limb, why would you amputate?” I took him to see the best orthopaedic surgeon I could find, who had just come back from America after more intensive training. He agreed with me. He actually went further and stated that if he attempted surgery he estimated the failure at 85% and then the high chance of infection and then the need for amputation as a direct result and said he categorically *would not* touch Roos leg and told me to take him home and ‘manage’ the leg. My own background is humble in qualifications and I get no credit for all the studying and experience I have, which I am sure many of you will identify with… nobody knows your dog or pet better than you and no amount of qualifications can make up for *knowing* a furry person. Anyways, my background for what its worth, 20 years working in the special needs sector with the full range of disabilities… I studied veterinary medicine (rabbit medicine) intensively for 5 years but really for about 10 years and was taking referrals from vets and advising world wide on the subject. I ran a hospice for rabbits for 5 years and dealt with quite a few disabled rabbits. I was highly trained in nursing by my vet and knowledge wise am somewhere between a vet nurse and a vet…. Fundamentally I know the difference between an animal or person that is sick from one that is disabled. I took flak from keeping disabled rabbits alive that were not ill. Back to Roo…. The easiest way to explain his condition is to say he has cerebral palsy. The vet did say something in Latin but basically he was born with a disabled leg that was atomically perfect but did not function because the messages between that legs muscles and the brain just wasnt happening. In a human we would call that cerebral palsy and every vet I said it to since hasnt disputed the terminology. And what use is Latin if nobody knows what you are talking about? Anyways, the prognosis of amputation was a distant memory and Roostar has seen his 6th birthday come and go… and now we have problems. Thats why I am here. I cant tell you what they are because he is yet to see the orthopaedic surgeon but if I can keep Roo as a quad pod I will…. what I wont do is hesitate if he needs amputation but ironically….. the problems now are in his ‘good’ leg.

There is one thing I take umbrage with and would respectfully ask admin to reconsider… The tag “It is better to hop on three legs than limp on four”… at the risk of sounding pedantic and picky… the gait of a tripod typically involves the ‘skip bob’ of a limping dog…. Roo sometimes has the ‘skip bob’ of a tripod and also of a dog with a limp…. I wonder if an albeit less catchy, tag might be “It is better to bounce through life on three legs than limp in pain on four”? I think the three legged dogs gait could potentially be called a limp but a bounce sounds so much more….. YEAH!!!!!!! I could have said ‘uplifting’ which would have been so cheesy it would smell like sweaty trainers ripe with fungal infection or ‘real’ but then I would sound like I was attatched to a bong or was a teenager with attitude…. just my thoughts as Mum to a quad pod with a skip bob but until a month ago wasnt in pain….

 

 

The Rainbow Bridge



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1 December 2013 - 9:25 am
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Thanks so much for joining! Your future posts won’t require moderation. Sorry for the quick reply, I’m on my way out the door but will be back with an official welcome.

It's better to hop on three legs than to limp on four.™
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Virginia




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3 December 2013 - 5:33 pm
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Hi Ribbo s!!

My goodness! What a journey you have been in…and are cntiuing o !

Yo are one very, very lucky pup to have such a powerful advocate going to bat for yoj!!

And vy the way, I love the bold blue ue print…it’s refreshing and easy to read!

And kudos to you for taking care of the bunnies! I love that! I actualy do a little “rehab” with orhan opossums! To me, they’re cute and cuddly and deserve just as much a chance as any other little critters! I kow your passion for the vunnies has been very rewarding. Thank you for helping those that others would turn their backs on.

And I like your new twist n the logo It’s certainly so ething we need to remember to tell “newbies” when they are struggling with amputation.

I can’t offer anyi sight into Roo’s situation as far as the outlook for his “now good leg”. You will see many situatins here where the decision was difficult onwhether to amutate becauseod the conditin of the remaining limb.

Check out MURPHY and check out DAISY. These are cases where remaining limbs had “issues” and their dogs have done remarkavly well!

HAPY SIXTH BIRTHDAY ROOSTER!! Your avatar picture is sooooo cute!! Hope your mom will post more!

Take care and please keep usposted n Rooster! We are all here to help support anyeay we can!!

Hugs to all!

Sally and Happh Hannah

Happy Hannah had a glorious additional bonus time of over one yr & two months after amp for osteo! She made me laugh everyday! Joined April's Angels after send off meal of steak, ice cream, M&Ms & deer poop!

The Rainbow Bridge



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3 December 2013 - 6:54 pm
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Hey Ribbons and Roo! Sorry I’m so late getting back here! We’re glad you joined. We love your enthusiasm and ability to share such pawesome insight with your veterinary medicine background (by the way you’ll have to see our post about Clyde the three-legged rabbit!).

Roo and you are both more than welcome to be here and join us. Honorary Tripawds are definitely a part of this family! We have lots of discussions about birth defects and limb deformities in our Beyond Cancer Discussion Topic which you might find interesting and useful.

So I’m curious about what type of treatment you’re pursuing for Roo’s back leg and what the prognosis is?

It's better to hop on three legs than to limp on four.™
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ribbons
5
4 December 2013 - 2:01 am
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jerry said
Hey Ribbons and Roo! Sorry I’m so late getting back here! We’re glad you joined. We love your enthusiasm and ability to share such pawesome insight with your veterinary medicine background (by the way you’ll have to see our post about Clyde the three-legged rabbit!).

Roo and you are both more than welcome to be here and join us. Honorary Tripawds are definitely a part of this family! We have lots of discussions about birth defects and limb deformities in our Beyond Cancer Discussion Topic which you might find interesting and useful.

So I’m curious about what type of treatment you’re pursuing for Roo’s back leg and what the prognosis is?

Jerry I wasnt kidding when I said I was advising world wide on the subject of rabbit medicine. You wont find a vet that can out advise me unless his name is Rami…. or Francis Harcourt Brown…..  But speak as you find.

I have not been able to access your website for a few hours for some reason.

Ok, in terms of the Roostar…. the prognosis will dictate the course of action.

Lets play out some scenarios. Rear good leg luxating patella. 1st option complete rest. It worked for Tuesday. She has very loose and luxating patellas. I did re-mortgage to have both knees fixed but in the three weeks it took for the monies to appear…. the tendons and what not tightened up and her knee caps stayed in place. She has luxated 3 times and rest on the crappy extending lead has been curative. So. If Roostar has a luxating patella I propose total rest, i.e. no running…. for 3 weeks, then review.

I will fashion a body sling from a canvas shopping bag to minimise weight bearing while maximising quality of life.

He will have twice daily rimadyl for the 5 days and then the vets suggest once daily to protect his intestines….. I will ‘discuss’ this after the 5 days pass……

Jerry I will straight up say that I believe in quality, not quantity. Whats the point of keeping a dog ‘safe on a lead’ for 15 years  when 10 glorious years of happy gay abandon is the alternative.

I made literally hundreds of such decisions while running the hospice. There were rabbits who literally were taken either straight to the vet for the ‘big blue’ or were sedated at home to the point of unconsciousness before being taken for humane passing.

I worked 20 years hard core front line social care and social work. I watched children I thought the world of die.

I will walk through flames to get Roostar fixed and I would die before I let him suffer. If that was your question regarding prognosis… I am not a vet, nor an ignoramous. If the vet is big blue happy, I will find a vet that isnt.

If my boy has no quality of life I will find a vet who is not into heroics.

Ultimately Roostar will be the dictator of his future.

For as long as he smiles, he stays. If I *know* he wont smile again… I love that dog with all of me and then some and I wont keep him with any selfishness..

The end.

ribbons
6
11 December 2013 - 8:05 pm
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To update the situation with Roostar as so many were interested. To remind you all he has cerebral palsy and one hind limb is already disabled. Its is hyper extended but functioning. The other (good) hind leg developed serious problems about 2 weeks ago and it has taken me this long to get an appointment with a wonderful orthopaedic surgeon.

Roostar went in today (now yesterday) for xrays and exam and he his hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis in his hips but they are not causing significant problems *however* he is lame on the good hind leg because he has ruptured his cruciate ligament.

He will require surgery. I am meeting with the surgeon again next week to discuss Roos case further and prepare us and the environment for the op. I will ask the surgeon for advice regarding a body harness to support Roo during this time and plan on acquiring an outdoor (human) wheelchair so he can still enjoy daily ‘walks’ with the girls without the need to leave him behind to get stressed out. He will be able to admire the world from his throne… well…. if a baby buggy is a chariot surely a wheelchair is a throne.

I have a large dog crate and plenty of vet bed so thats covered. My primary concern at the moment is finding a body support harness that would pass a manual handling assessment with regards to protecting my injured back and that I am struggling with… but I will ask the surgeon about that.

Thanks all for the kind wishes. He is on pain relief and the specialist said no to tramadol. I have complete faith in this vet.

I would add that my camera and the almost daily recordings have proved invaluable. I also went back through Roostars clin hist and as a former social worker I already knew that the paper trail of evidence was valuable but certain bits proved critical in his diagnosing and the prognosis. All three of my dogs were seen by the same vet from when they arrived and while the girls had loose kneecaps, Roo didnt and now does and little bits of info like that make a picture out of a jigsaw. It was reassuring to look back over 4 weeks and see initially an issue with the disabled leg, that then was completely resolved, a short period of no issues at all and no pain relief before the acute onset of his now devastating injury. I dont know how many of you keep video diaries but over the last couple of days when I was in deep despair I was also able to laugh and see things in a clearer perspective. It would be nice to write a post about the benefits that are not always obvious of the video diaries but I am not inclined to do so at the moment. I have been through the wringer today. Maybe someone else could open that topic. Such an important tool all round it is worth its own topic.

Anyways, thats Roos story now…. my semi tripod will be a bipod for a bit and with all the luck and prayers and blessing from Karma he will soon be back to his old happy feet.

Our journey there has just begun. I am gathering around us all the equipment and good kind people for morale support because while I carry Roo on his path to recovery I know there are times when I will also need to be carried. And there is nothing wrong with admitting you are human and asking for support. The road to hell is paved with good intentions and walked most often by fools and martyrs.

We are not heading that way. Thanks again for all the kind wishes throughout the forum.

Columbia, MO
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11 December 2013 - 8:51 pm
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As tough as it is at least now you know what you are dealing with.  My Daisy is a front left amp due to arthritic destruction of her elbow joint.  About 1-1/2 years prior to her amp she was diagnosed with hip dysplasia and arthritis in her hips also.  She has managed pretty well as a tripawd with those bad hips.

In May she had a complete rupture of her right knee.  We too had to have surgery.  Do you know yet which procedure Roo will have?  Daisy had a lateral suture stabilization since it was the least invasive of the procedures and the one I was most comfortable with.  It’s kind of frightening having a surgery on one of their only 3 remaining legs!  Recovery for us was pretty rough.  It was tough for her to manage on just two legs with me assisting her with a sling.  But we did it and so will you and Roo!

Best of luck and keep us posted on how he is doing.

Marla and Daisy

My Two Tripawds...Biscuit and Spirit Daisy

Virginia




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11 December 2013 - 11:38 pm
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Wendy and Roo!

I won’t waste your tkme repeatkng what we’ve already PMd about. I will say how very thrilled I am that you will llet js help yoj durng this “challengng” time. As I’ve mentioned a d as evidenced by Daisy’s quick response, you have a lot of supporters here and we are n awe of all the good work yo are doing.

I knlw you are minimizng your own nealth challenges. We all wish we could help you physically right now, but emotional support will jave to suffice.

Love your idea of the video diaryclap Speaking of videos…how ’bout posting the youtube fo. you gave me and then everyone can see yor pack.

Wendy, we ARE here to support you! We ARE here to carry you. I do hope you have someone ear yoj who can help with the liftng. And if you dn’t get your own back looked after, Roo and Ribbns and Tuesday will be carrying yoo around!

Thank you again fr all the dedication you jave given so many ani als who would never kow what llve feels lke.

Welcome home Wendy.

Love and hugs to all!

Sally and Happy Hannah

Happy Hannah had a glorious additional bonus time of over one yr & two months after amp for osteo! She made me laugh everyday! Joined April's Angels after send off meal of steak, ice cream, M&Ms & deer poop!

ribbons
9
11 December 2013 - 11:53 pm
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Thanks Marla.

I have all but gone clean out of my mind with the stress and worry. So many scenarios were hijacking my mind and as the appointment drew nearer I think it was only knowing I have responsibilities towards all three dogs that kept me together.

Watching and feeling helpless to do anything is such a negative place to wait for an appointment but I was advised very strongly to wait for this particular surgeon because of his dedication regarding rooting out the cause of a problem matched with the skills to put it right. While I was waiting to be seen a woman brought in what she called her ‘bionic’ cat that this surgeon had rebuilt. He was very focused on pin pointing the actual issue and it was quite refreshing that when I started saying how first his disabled leg had gone and then recovered he stopped me dead and said words to the effect of not needing to hear about a leg that wasnt causing him pain, he was interested in the problem now, not last months….. and the reason I liked and appreciated his attitude was hard to put into words but I will try. It would be easy to be side tracked by a glaringly obvious disabled leg and that would be a pointless distraction and …. sorry, I am really exhausted…. disability always draws attention to itself but he did not allow the emotive draw of a disabled but functioning leg to clutter his thinking and it is a rare thing for anybody to dismiss it as unimportant and I liked him very much for that because he wasnt looking at a disabled dog, he was looking at a dog with a serious mobility problem and I still dont think I have managed to put into words the subtle difference between dismissing it because it was not a primary issue, while he also managed to keep the fact he was more or less a tripod in the bigger picture and was very much aware that he needed that other leg fixing.

I give up trying to explain because I cant make sense in my own head so if anybody else gets what I am trying to say… well done.

I am leery of mentioning my own health conditions for fear of being accused of ‘thinking of myself and not Roo’ but I will say because my physical health is relevant to the situation. Heck, I will do it later. I think my brain has finally shut down.

ribbons
10
12 December 2013 - 12:07 am
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jerry said
Hey Ribbons and Roo! Sorry I’m so late getting back here! We’re glad you joined. We love your enthusiasm and ability to share such pawesome insight with your veterinary medicine background (by the way you’ll have to see our post about Clyde the three-legged rabbit!).

Roo and you are both more than welcome to be here and join us. Honorary Tripawds are definitely a part of this family! We have lots of discussions about birth defects and limb deformities in our Beyond Cancer Discussion Topic which you might find interesting and useful.

So I’m curious about what type of treatment you’re pursuing for Roo’s back leg and what the prognosis is?

 

Jerry, I took on a rabbit that was a double hind limb amputee. I have a couple of photos and also can find her story if you are interested. Her back feet were bitten off in the nest when she was 2 days old and was left for 5 months with abscessed stumps. After I finally managed to get her out of the grip of the hoarder she was with I was faced with a stark reality and choice. This rabbit has survived for 5 whole months, dragging herself round a urine soaked and soiled floor….. what right did I have to take her life away after she had fought so hard to stay and was actually ill. I had her stumps surgically taken back above the infection, to the knee and she lived on vet bed, running free. She was put to sleep for an unrelated infection. The story of the hoarder with 300 rabbits and her liberation from what can only be described as rabbit hell, he zest for life and the freedom she gained and the other rabbits she lived with…. she was remarkable.

The Rainbow Bridge



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12 December 2013 - 12:26 am
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Well the day finally came and you made it. Yay!

It’s great that the surgeon is optimistic about Roo’s chances for a good recovery. As you can tell by Marla and Daisy’s story it is definitely possible to successfully deal with recovery on a Tripawd. You obviously have the dedication to give him the kind of attention and care that he needs during and after. Whatever we can do to help make it easier just holler.

It's better to hop on three legs than to limp on four.™
Latest Tripawds News
Read my story here.

Support the Tripawds Foundation!

ribbons
12
12 December 2013 - 1:40 am
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jerry said
Well the day finally came and you made it. Yay!

It’s great that the surgeon is optimistic about Roo’s chances for a good recovery. As you can tell by Marla and Daisy’s story it is definitely possible to successfully deal with recovery on a Tripawd. You obviously have the dedication to give him the kind of attention and care that he needs during and after. Whatever we can do to help make it easier just holler.

 

 

Marla and Daisys story is truly inspirational and I know that Marla must have bust her guts with the sheer dedication and skill with the care she took. Their story inspires me because the factor that makes it more critical is that it was a front limb amp. I know they are the toughest.

I have been suspended in stress hell being very much aware of the gravity of Roos situation. Nigel the surgeon summed it up by defining it as life threatening. Dogs like bipedal Hope are the exception, not, by any stretch of optimistic imagination, the rule and because of all the mixed messages and lack of concrete facts it has been very overwhelming.

Normally I am the consummate professional….. I have worked very closely with children and adults who had degenerative/terminal illness and I am usually very good at holding it together until it is convenient to break down but this certainly has had a pretty big emotional toll.

I really admire Marla and her understated pragmatic attitude. She is absolutely right. At least I know what I am dealing with and gosh the ‘not knowing’ for me is always worse and I really did build myself up into a frenzy waiting for that appointment.

I will try to put aside some lingering resentment because there is a question I want to ask people about their experience of but not sure what heading to put it under.

In a nut shell the problem I want to get case history/experiences of is the use of the support slings/harnesses.

I thought the full body support harness/sling would be most appropriate for Roo but … if you look at the straps, or strap…. it requires the human to support the weight of the dog while their own body is in a …. compromised position.

I really want to have a sensible discussion about the real risks posed to the humans spine when using harnesses and slings because in the first instance…. I need to find one I can safely use…. but I would not wish my injury on anybody.

What heading would be the most appropriate to discuss slings/harnesses under please because I need to make a purchase as soon as possible.

Thanks.

 

Virginia




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12 December 2013 - 11:40 am
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Wendy…yeah, rhat little rabvit had an incredible will to live and was, indde, remarkable……and so are you for making herculean efforts to give her the best life possible.

Just a suggestion on the sling issue…..search here, or google, or wherever…and then ckntact them directly about yor specifics concerns, not only related to the dog, but to the human with spine issues also. Can’t remember if this has been discussed or not, but Eddie’s Carts (probably don’t have the name right…but it wheel chair carts for dogs) may be a possibility for Rooster also.

Hugs to you and all your furbabies!

Sally and Hapoy Hannah

Happy Hannah had a glorious additional bonus time of over one yr & two months after amp for osteo! She made me laugh everyday! Joined April's Angels after send off meal of steak, ice cream, M&Ms & deer poop!

The Rainbow Bridge



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12 December 2013 - 12:48 pm
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Lots of feedback on harness and use of them in our Hopping Around discussion topic here (which is the best place to talk about harneesses and such in the forums):

http://tripawds…..;include=1

Also, the AST has a shoulder strap that may be helpful to you. Scroll down to see how it works.
http://gear.tri…..or-my-dog/

It's better to hop on three legs than to limp on four.™
Latest Tripawds News
Read my story here.

Support the Tripawds Foundation!

ribbons
15
12 December 2013 - 11:10 pm
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jerry said
Lots of feedback on harness and use of them in our Hopping Around discussion topic here (which is the best place to talk about harneesses and such in the forums):
http://tripawds…..;include=1
Also, the AST has a shoulder strap that may be helpful to you. Scroll down to see how it works.
http://gear.tri…..or-my-dog/

 

 

It was actually the shoulder strap I was trying to avoid…. the shopping bag handle is probably safer but a combination of both perhaps best. Basically the safest way to manually handle is for the shoulders and hips to be square on…. if the shoulder strap is used the chances are there will be a lean at shoulder level towards the weight that is being carried. This will then cause a curve in the spine at a side ways angle, which is the worst possible compromise of the spine. The discs between each vertebrae will be being squashed and, in my particular case, I have two prolapsed discs, one of which has basically started to break apart and both are leaning against my sciatic nerve. If the discs move even slightly and impinge or squeeze the nerve…. how will I be able to provide proper care? 

Theres no words that I could ever find to adequately tell you how painful a crushed or burst disc thats crushes the sciatic nerve is. I cant go into hospital because my dogs have complex and intensive needs so I need to keep my spine safe….. but suspect I will probably end up needing surgery by the time Roo is done. My situation is further complicated by my intolerance to pain meds. My lungs just dont like morphine. Anyways, I will look at the hopping around threads and also ask the surgeon next week Tuesday. Its kinda helpful that he is an orthopaedic surgeon because I wont need to explain to him my issues if I just show him my scan results.

The hospital have been amazing about trying to accommodate my absolute need to be at home with my dogs and when other issues, including Roos op and post op care are done with then I will get around to sorting out my back. In the mean time I have to make sure I dont mess it up further to require an emergency admission. I have a dog that stops breathing and needs close monitoring and twice daily meds which are PRN according to my obs so I cant put that responsibility on anybody else.

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