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think a tripawd could handle SAR?
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Morgantown, WV
Forum Posts: 32
Member Since:
26 October 2011
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21 November 2011 - 10:41 pm
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Hi all!  I was attending a vet tech conference in DC this weekend, and we went to a lecture and demonstration put on by the Virginia Search and Rescue Dog Association.  Somehow it just really struck a chord with me, I've done animal rescue in the past and it was immensely rewarding.  To train up a SAR dog from puppyhood, to take that dog out into the field and find missing people, the idea just takes my breath away.  My current dogs are too old, however (it's recommended that you start training when the dog is no more than 2 years old, because initial training can take like 2 years and then of course the dog never really stops training and learning).  We probably won't get another dog for about a year, or at the very least until I'm out of school which is about another 6 months.  So I've got it in my head that with our next pup, I'll be looking for qualities desirable in a SAR dog.

Of course, I gotta wonder, would a tripawd be able to handle search and rescue work?  I mean, I know they get around every day just as well as quads, but what about out in the field?  Thick brush, jagged plants?  Rubble, demolished buildings?  We saw a picture of a GSD in New Orleans after Katrina, this dog was scaling the roof of a house that was tipped over, the roof was at nearly a 90 degree tilt and you could tell that dog was working hard to get up it; I just wonder if it would be too tough for a tripawd.  I'd seriously love to adopt a young 3-legged dog, owning a tripawd is a very enriching experience.  But do I have to choose between 3 legs and a great tracking nose?  What do you guys think?

I'm Crystal, but you can call me Katymom.  :)  I'm Triproud of my Tripawd!

Katy Sue Sarcopski – born approx 2/03, found "the lump" 9/7/11, suspected soft tissue sarcoma (most likely liposarcoma) 10/11, became a Tripawd 11/1/11, official diagnosis of infiltrating lipoma 11/23/11

Follow her "tail" at katydidit.tripawds.com!

Leicester, NY
Forum Posts: 422
Member Since:
11 February 2011
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22 November 2011 - 4:26 am
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I was looking at this tripawd Bloodhound but I do not have the time to work with a dog like this (because of workconfused)

http://tripawds.....me-needed/

I think a bloodhound could do missing person tracking as opposed to climbing around a disaster site.

Good luck!

Spirit Samson was Spirit Tripawd Daisys four legged "brother" and ruled as the self proclaimed head of the Monkeybutt Federations East Coast Division. Lady Chunky Monkey stayed from Oct 2011 and left for the bridge in Apr 2012. Miss Perdy is left and has some big pawprints to fill.
Do you have what it takes to be a Monkeybutt? Find out more at the Monkeybutt Federation

knoxville, tn
Forum Posts: 1705
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22 November 2011 - 8:08 am
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we would have to wonder if you might be asking your pup to do thinkgs that would be to tough on their 'physical abilities'.  you know their hearts are willing, and they would do anything you asked, but would you be asking them to punish their bodies to do this job?  seems like you are asking too much, when there are four legged pups who are so capable and who can do this without putting the addition stress on themselves physically.  just hopping around is very 'pounding' on shoulders, hips and spines...  just saying, seems you would be pushing your pup to do something that you should not.  other thoughts?

charon & gayle

 

and if you are interested in service, there are other opportunities such as reading with kids, visiting hospitals, etc... for a tripawd.

Life is good, so very, very good!!! Gayle enjoyed each and every moment of each and every wonderful day (naps included).  She left this world December 12, 2011 – off on a new adventure.

Love Never Ends

http://etgayle

The Rainbow Bridge



Forum Posts: 31089
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22 November 2011 - 8:16 am
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Oh that is a neat thought isn't it?! Being rescued by a Tripawd and all..

I agree with Samson, gentle, low key tracking would probably be better for a Tripawd than SAR work in a disaster site. And like Gayle said, while a Tripawd can physically do just about anything that a quadpawd can do, it's more of a question of "should they?" A rehab vet would probably say that over the long haul, heavy duty SAR work would probably be too hard on a Tripawd's body, since they are already compensating so much for the missing leg (even though humans can't really see that, other than the visible Tripawd hop).

Your comment about standing on a 90 degree angle made me think of this pic. Check out this crazy angle that Wyatt Ray stood on when modeling his Ruff Wear boots (it's not as high as it looks, the camera was almost on the ground and looking up when we took the pic).

Image Enlarger

It's better to hop on three legs than to limp on four.™
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ARIZONA
Forum Posts: 41
Member Since:
1 September 2011
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22 November 2011 - 12:44 pm
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There are several different types and degrees of SAR dogs.

Some search out very specific things and others do it all.

It is a very physically demanding job on both of you.

My concern is there are timed events you must go through to get certified.

My Tripawd thinks he is the fastest dog on three legs,

maybe some Tripawds just are not?

Wyatt - non cancer Tripawd

~ missing front left paw ~

10 pounds and bulletproof!

San Diego, CA
Forum Posts: 2503
Member Since:
29 October 2010
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22 November 2011 - 2:01 pm
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We have had Abby for over a year now as a tripawd. She is only 2 so very high energy and does a lot of running and playing. But, her max time for that is an hour. I don't know how long these SAR operations can last or how much time the training puts in, but if it's a long time, it could be pretty taxing on a tripawd.

Also, we are now on our 2nd overuse injury with Abby (at least we are pretty sure this is her 2nd one - keeping an eye on her). First it was her toe, now it's her wrist. Her onc was saying this morning that tripawds do risk more injuries than quadpawds, just because there's no other leg there to help compensate if they lose their footing.

We probably do more with Abby than we "should" but since she has metastasized cancer and there's not really a question of sparing her limbs for the "long term" we let her go full-bore. If she was a non-cancer tripawd, I would probably try to make her go a little easier on herself.

I think it's a lovely idea - but maybe not the best idea for the dog. As Charon said - there are other rewarding options you could pursue with a tripawd though.

Jackie, Abby's mom

Abby: Aug 1, 2009 – Jan 10, 2012. Our beautiful rescue pup lived LARGE with osteosarcoma for 15 months – half her way-too-short life. I think our "halflistic" approach (mixing traditional meds + supplements) helped her thrive. (PM me for details. I'm happy to help.) She had lung mets for over a year. They took her from us in the end, but they cannot take her spirit! She will live forever in our hearts. She loved the beach and giving kisses and going to In-N-Out for a Flying Dutchman. Tripawds blog, and a more detailed blog here. Please also check out my novel, What the Dog Ate. Now also in paperback! Purchase it at Amazon via Tripawds and help support Tripawds!

Morgantown, WV
Forum Posts: 32
Member Since:
26 October 2011
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22 November 2011 - 11:02 pm
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Thanks guys, you're pretty much saying what I was thinking.  I wasn't planning on doing SAR with Katy, no way, she's going on 9 years old and I just wouldn't be able to do the intensive training with her.  She's my lil tripawd ambassador, she goes to school with me and just out and about, making friends.  🙂  Any dog I get in the future for SAR work will be young, between 6 months and a year old.  And will pretty much have to have 4 legs.

This is not to say that I won't adopt a tripawd in the future as well.  I still think they're very special dogs and I love owning one.  They have their own special brand of service, just being them.  🙂  I like the idea of a tripawd therapy dog, that's definitely something to consider, heck Katy could do that right now.  I just hardly have time to do anything while I'm in school.  Over Christmas break I'll have some time to breathe, look into stuff, we'll see.  Generally I believe that working dogs are happy dogs, dogs with a purpose, with a job, I think they have better attitudes and are easier to handle.  The trick is figuring out what job a dog is meant for.  Right now, Katy's job is being my babydog and telling the world, "pfft, who needs 4 legs?"  Suits her just fine.  🙂

I'm Crystal, but you can call me Katymom.  :)  I'm Triproud of my Tripawd!

Katy Sue Sarcopski – born approx 2/03, found "the lump" 9/7/11, suspected soft tissue sarcoma (most likely liposarcoma) 10/11, became a Tripawd 11/1/11, official diagnosis of infiltrating lipoma 11/23/11

Follow her "tail" at katydidit.tripawds.com!

ARIZONA
Forum Posts: 41
Member Since:
1 September 2011
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23 November 2011 - 9:08 am
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Sounds like you have lots to do and think about.smiley

If you get a chance, read this wonderful book,

Scent of the Missing: Love and Partnership with a
Search-and-Rescue Dog by Susannah Charleson

Another SAR fact - 80% of dogs started in the program

are rejected.

 

Good luck and have a restful Christmas break.

Wyatt - non cancer Tripawd

~ missing front left paw ~

10 pounds and bulletproof!

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