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Caring for a Three Legged Dog or Cat

Tripawds is the place to learn how to care for a three legged dog or cat, with answers about dog leg amputation, and cat amputation recovery from many years of member experiences.
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slippery floors
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kerry
1
16 September 2008 - 2:24 pm
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Hi there

My name is Max a 5 year old Australian Cattle Dog and i’ve just lost my right front leg due to cancer.  My mum and dad have these lovely woodern floors and we were wondering if anyone had any experience on how to over come me slipping on them.  We wondered if anyone has used dog shoes and did they work?  

The Rainbow Bridge



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16 September 2008 - 5:06 pm
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Thanks for asking Max! You’ll find a lot of discussion about new tripawds and slippery floors throughout these forums.

We strongly suggest putting down runners. That’s what my people did in my old hardwood floor house.

Some owners have purchased Ruff Wear Bark’n Boots from us for additional traction . Their SkyLiner dog booties are more for city dogs, or casual use providing extra traction and paw protection from a wide range of temperatures and abrasive surfaces.

The Grip Trex dog boots are all-condition, all-terrain, all-season dog booties better suited for "off-road" use. 

These are available as single units or in sets of four. Complete details and sizing instructions for Bark’n Boots can be found on the Ruff Wear Website.

Please feel free to email us with your shipping address and preferred style/size/color for a great price including shipping. We haven’t posted the Ruff Wear boots on this site for sale yet.

It's better to hop on three legs than to limp on four.™
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LeeAnn
3
16 September 2008 - 6:51 pm
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We too put down runners, which worked wonderfully. I also saw this product in a catalog recently–no idea how well they work, but here’s a link for adhesive paw traction pads

The Rainbow Bridge



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18 October 2008 - 10:48 pm
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Hey everybody,

We wanted to let you know about some reports that are coming in regarding dog boots for tripawds.

Lots of dogs wear booties, like musher dogs, and after they get used to them, they don’t have a problem walking with them. But it seems that the learning curve for Tripawds who haven’t worn boots before is just too great. A couple of front leg tripawds we know have stumbled one too many times when trying to get used to the boots, and those spills were too nervewracking for their pawrents. We don’t blame them one bit. 

I never had to get them, because I never had to get along in snow on a daily basis, which is why it seems a lot of pawrents get them. As far as coping with slippery floors, well, I just got along without the boots and did pretty good.

Maybe rear leg amputees have an easier time using them. If you are a rear leg amuptee who wears dog boots, we’d love to hear from you.

Meanwhile, you front leg tripawds may not want to rush into buying these booties, as it could be frustrating and potentially dangerous for you to get used to them. 

Perhaps something like paw traction pads, or paw traction wax might be your best bet. 

Please feel free to share any and all booties stories here. Thanks!

 

It's better to hop on three legs than to limp on four.™
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19 October 2008 - 2:44 am
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Tazzie has done very well with her booties, but she doesn’t wear them all of the time.  She still has a pressure sore on her front foot that is healing slowly (probably due to chemo) so I put her sturdy boot on (Grip-Trex) if she will be out in the yard with us a lot or running in the park.  I put the softer booties on her rear feet only if she has to go to the clinic for chemo or get in the van because they really do help her on slick surfaces.  She never tries to chew them but I take them off if we aren’t home, since she just sleeps anyway.

The only problem I have had is that if you don’t get the Velcro wrap tight enough around the top of the bootie, they can turn around 180 degrees and then the dog is walking on the top of the bootie.  I think you really need to measure accurately to make sure they aren’t too big.  Tazzie has an XXL for her front foot because it spreads out more to bear her weight, but on her rear feet an XL works better.

I have not let her do flights of stairs yet, with or without booties, because I am too afraid of her taking a header on the way down.

Pam and Tazzie

The Rainbow Bridge



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19 October 2008 - 2:09 pm
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tazziedog said:

I think you really need to measure accurately…


Thanks for the input Tazzie! Glad they’re workin’ out for you. We also believe that correct sizing is very important for the boots.

As much as we’d really love to sell them to folks, it may be best to get them at a Ruff Wear retailer so the dog can try them on first.

They can always come back to us for the purchase after confirming the right size! Wink

It's better to hop on three legs than to limp on four.™
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19 October 2008 - 3:07 pm
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  Tazziedog I’m so glad the issue of pressure sores have come up. Perhaps this should go under a new topic but lately I’ve been dealing with this  with Buster. He is a front paw amputee and he has put on some lbs lately. His remaining paw on the pad actually on its side seems to split open and bleed. It is a minor sore however it has been happening more often. We did have a busy day at the park yesterday which is how I believe it happened.

   When this occurs , I try my best to keep it clean with peroxide, then topical antibiotic. I never walk him when he has one. However it does  take awhile to heal. I’ve tried to wrap with co-flex however he just gnaws it off.

  Is there anything I can do to prevent this? Is there any natural supplements I can give to speed up the healing?

  Kim&Buster

Kim & Angel Buster

"Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakened."
–Anatole France

Edmonton
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19 October 2008 - 5:37 pm
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OKim1 said:

lately I’ve been dealing with this  with Buster. He is a front paw amputee and he has put on some lbs lately. His remaining paw on the pad actually on its side seems to split open and bleed. It is a minor sore however it has


I managed to dig out a link from my bookmarks archive FYI: http://lowchens…..tions2.htm

Genie’s pads were quite bad during her final month, as she only put weight on two and a half legs.  I applied vaseline on the pads before bedtime, so her pads wouldn’t get dried and cracked.  During day time when she hopped more often, I applied emu oil frequently.  Topical vitamin E oil is supposed to be good too, but I didn’t get the chance to try.

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19 October 2008 - 11:35 pm
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 That is some good info Genie…  I know it will be sticky for him but at least it will help. The site also mentioned bag balm.  Hope he doesn’t try to lick it offTongue out Yuck

Kim & Angel Buster

"Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakened."
–Anatole France

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