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Kilo's amputation tomorrow/rear left leg from nerve sheath cancer
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7 November 2018 - 9:23 pm
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So happy to have found this support group.  Was searching for tripod dogs on YouTube and found happy dogs running and playing.  My Kilo is 10 years old. He is 55 lbs and in excellent shape.  He is part Am Pit Bull Terrier.  He was diagnosis with nerve sheath cancer January 2018.  He had some fatty lumps scheduled to be removed.  One place on his hind leg was a little suspicious due to being harder and oblong.  A biopsy confirmed cancer.  The Vet tried to remove the cancer the best he could and said time would tell in the next six months.  Well in the 7th month the lump started growing again.  After returning in the middle of October from a 7 week motorhome trip with him we returned to the Vet and was told due to the lump growing rapidly he suggested amputation.  He said cutting into the muscle with wide margins couldn’t guarantee getting it all out and the healing process would be painful.  And in the end the leg would probably still have to be amputated.  Our dog is very active and the last surgery with multiple cuts from removing other fatty lumps one on his front leg took a while to heal with him running and jumping.  So I did not want to subject him to unnecessary cuttings and pain when the final outcome would still be amputation. The good news is that his cancer is localized and doesn’t spread.  It  will causes pain and eventually atrophy to the muscle.  I’ve already been given some good advise on how to keep Kilo calm after returning home Friday.  Will be looking for more advise on what to expect in the next few days and weeks to come in his rehab process.  

The Rainbow Bridge

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7 November 2018 - 9:42 pm
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Anita, welcome! We are so sorry about Kiko but very glad you found our community! We will do our best to help make the recovery as easy as possible.

You definitely made a good decision for Kiko. Sometimes that kind of cancer is just impossible to control with surgical resections and you have to pull out the big guns. As scary as amputation is, at least you can both put the cancer behind you and move on.

I know Admin talked to you today in the Tripawds Cat and gave you lots of good tips. Be sure to also check out our Tripawds e-books library, and holler with any questions at all. We are here for you!

It's better to hop on three legs than to limp on four.™
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Virginia
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8 November 2018 - 10:00 am
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I love Kilo’s avatar picture.  Very handsome  boy!

Yeah, it is scary to decide  about amputation .  It’s  major surgery and  recovery  is no picnic  for a couple  of weeks.  HOWEVER, it’s  ONE surgery , one recovery and then done!!!  It sounds like Kilo has a lot of spunk and determination  and that’s  a great attitude  to have!

You’ll want to have a good pain management plan in place, so discuss thst with your Surgeon.   Most  dogs  come home with  Tramadol, Gabapentin, Rimadyl (or something similar)  and an antibiotic. 

Every recovery is different  and every dog is different.  Some come home the first couple of days high from the hospital meds and act like they want to run and play.  Some come home zapped and just lay around  for days (actually a better scenario as far as recovery  is concerened).   Some dogs take several days or longer to get mobile, and some are walking within the first 24 hrs.Then once the hospital  meds are out of their system in about three days, a “crash” happens sometimes.

Peeing and drinking are important.   Pooping may take a few days and loss of appetite  may happens for a few days.  Keep any yummy foods around he may like to help coat his tummy with the meds.

Keep in mind it is MAJOR SURGERY and Kilo needs rest, rest, rest, short potty breaks and more rest!

When you do big up Kilo from the clinic (is it 24 hr staffed?), don’t  even vother tomlook at the incision.   Kilo jist want to see yoir smiling  face telling him what a good voy he is and he’s  going home!  When you do take a glance, just know a lot of fur is shaved!!

Oh, and if you jave hardwood floors, You’ll want non slip scatter drugs for traction .

STAY CONNECTED!!  YOU ARE NOT ALONE!!  We are here to help in anyway you can!  Kilo will be sooo glad to jave that bum leg gone!!

Hugs

Sally and Alumni Happy Hannah and Merry Myrtle and Frankie too 

Happy Hannah had a glorious additional bonus time of over one yr & two months after amp for osteo! She made me laugh everyday! Joined April's Angels after send off meal of steak, ice cream, M&Ms & deer poop!

Livermore, CA
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8 November 2018 - 10:19 am
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Hello and welcome to you and Kilo.

First- I hope all goes well today!

I’ve had two rear amp Tripawds.  My first, Tri-Pug Maggie, lost a leg to mast cell cancer.  She lived almost 4 years and never really had any trouble.  Then again, she was a 7.5 year old Pug so I wouldn’t really call her ‘active’!

My current Tripawd is Elly, a little Pug mix who lost her right rear leg after being hit by a car at 7 months old. She came to me at 10 months old so fully healed from the surgery but not very strong.  She was however full of puppy energy!  Since she has her whole life ahead of her on three I wanted to be sure and get her and keep her strong and fit.  She is almost 4 years old now and doing well.  In order to keep her busy and burn energy I got lots of food puzzles and games.  They challenge her mind and do tire her out, and as an added benefit they make her work on her core strength and balance and she doesn’t even know it!  We also do balance exercises and core strength exercises a few times a week.  A couple years ago I discovered Nose Work which is an excellent way to challenge her mind and burn energy, and it is easy on her body.  I actually started NW to work on her fear and lack of confidence issues, which it has helped immensely, but it really does make her work and she loves it. 

Traction is really important for Tripawds, especially new ones learning to navigate their new normal.  Our most slippery surface is tile, which Elly can hop on fine is she goes slowly. I have rugs in strategic locations- I wish I could have more but I live with my elderly Father and too many rugs turned into a trip hazard for him.  Elly actually goes around the kitchen when she can, and has learned to go rug to rug when she has to cross tile areas.

Let us know how the surgery goes today.

Karen and the Spirit Pug Girls

Tri-pug Maggie survived a 4.5 year mast cell cancer battle only to be lost to oral melanoma.

1999 to 2010

 

              Maggie's Story                  Amputation and Chemo

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8 November 2018 - 1:59 pm
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Anita said
So happy to have found this support group.  Was searching for tripod dogs on YouTube and found happy dogs running and playing.  My Kilo is 10 years old. He is 55 lbs and in excellent shape.  He is part Am Pit Bull Terrier.  He was diagnosis with nerve sheath cancer January 2018.  He had some fatty lumps scheduled to be removed.  One place on his hind leg was a little suspicious due to being harder and oblong.  A biopsy confirmed cancer.  The Vet tried to remove the cancer the best he could and said time would tell in the next six months.  Well in the 7th month the lump started growing again.  After returning in the middle of October from a 7 week motorhome trip with him we returned to the Vet and was told due to the lump growing rapidly he suggested amputation.  He said cutting into the muscle with wide margins couldn’t guarantee getting it all out and the healing process would be painful.  And in the end the leg would probably still have to be amputated.  Our dog is very active and the last surgery with multiple cuts from removing other fatty lumps one on his front leg took a while to heal with him running and jumping.  So I did not want to subject him to unnecessary cuttings and pain when the final outcome would still be amputation. The good news is that his cancer is localized and doesn’t spread.  It  will causes pain and eventually atrophy to the muscle.  I’ve already been given some good advise on how to keep Kilo calm after returning home Friday.  Will be looking for more advise on what to expect in the next few days and weeks to come in his rehab process.    

Update Nov 8 2018.  Took Kilo in for his surgery this morning.  Our Vet Doctor Jon met with us and brought in his senior Vet Dr Dave to examined Kilo. Dr Jon said after our visit two weeks ago Kilo was on his mind weighing out the options of removing the tumor again or removing his leg.   Upon examination, Dr Dave conferred with Dr Jon in agreement that maybe amputation wasn’t in the best interest for Kilo at this time and said removal of the benign tumor again would be best.   So our Kilo will be returned to us later today with the incision to heal and still have his leg to use.  Keep us in your thoughts and dog prayers that this is the best option for Kilo at this time and his healing isn’t too painful due to the cut into the muscle.  Thank you all and will still read posts about everyones tripawds success stories.  We still may have to cross this bridge in the future years and all the information will be helpful. heart

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8 November 2018 - 2:06 pm
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krun15 said
Hello and welcome to you and Kilo.

First- I hope all goes well today!

I’ve had two rear amp Tripawds.  My first, Tri-Pug Maggie, lost a leg to mast cell cancer.  She lived almost 4 years and never really had any trouble.  Then again, she was a 7.5 year old Pug so I wouldn’t really call her ‘active’!

My current Tripawd is Elly, a little Pug mix who lost her right rear leg after being hit by a car at 7 months old. She came to me at 10 months old so fully healed from the surgery but not very strong.  She was however full of puppy energy!  Since she has her whole life ahead of her on three I wanted to be sure and get her and keep her strong and fit.  She is almost 4 years old now and doing well.  In order to keep her busy and burn energy I got lots of food puzzles and games.  They challenge her mind and do tire her out, and as an added benefit they make her work on her core strength and balance and she doesn’t even know it!  We also do balance exercises and core strength exercises a few times a week.  A couple years ago I discovered Nose Work which is an excellent way to challenge her mind and burn energy, and it is easy on her body.  I actually started NW to work on her fear and lack of confidence issues, which it has helped immensely, but it really does make her work and she loves it. 

Traction is really important for Tripawds, especially new ones learning to navigate their new normal.  Our most slippery surface is tile, which Elly can hop on fine is she goes slowly. I have rugs in strategic locations- I wish I could have more but I live with my elderly Father and too many rugs turned into a trip hazard for him.  Elly actually goes around the kitchen when she can, and has learned to go rug to rug when she has to cross tile areas.

Let us know how the surgery goes today.

Karen and the Spirit Pug Girls  

Thanks for your story on your two dogs.  The amputation of my dog Kilo’s rear leg has been put off as the doctor has elected to remove the tumor again after conferring with his senior doctor in clinic.  I’m relieved as this will give me more time to research on how to deal with a loss of limb in the future if it comes to that.  Give Elly an ear scratch from me and Kilo. big-grin

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8 November 2018 - 2:19 pm
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benny55 said
I love Kilo’s avatar picture.  Very handsome  boy!

Yeah, it is scary to decide  about amputation .  It’s  major surgery and  recovery  is no picnic  for a couple  of weeks.  HOWEVER, it’s  ONE surgery , one recovery and then done!!!  It sounds like Kilo has a lot of spunk and determination  and that’s  a great attitude  to have!

You’ll want to have a good pain management plan in place, so discuss thst with your Surgeon.   Most  dogs  come home with  Tramadol, Gabapentin, Rimadyl (or something similar)  and an antibiotic. 

Every recovery is different  and every dog is different.  Some come home the first couple of days high from the hospital meds and act like they want to run and play.  Some come home zapped and just lay around  for days (actually a better scenario as far as recovery  is concerened).   Some dogs take several days or longer to get mobile, and some are walking within the first 24 hrs.Then once the hospital  meds are out of their system in about three days, a “crash” happens sometimes.

Peeing and drinking are important.   Pooping may take a few days and loss of appetite  may happens for a few days.  Keep any yummy foods around he may like to help coat his tummy with the meds.

Keep in mind it is MAJOR SURGERY and Kilo needs rest, rest, rest, short potty breaks and more rest!

When you do big up Kilo from the clinic (is it 24 hr staffed?), don’t  even vother tomlook at the incision.   Kilo jist want to see yoir smiling  face telling him what a good voy he is and he’s  going home!  When you do take a glance, just know a lot of fur is shaved!!

Oh, and if you jave hardwood floors, You’ll want non slip scatter drugs for traction .

STAY CONNECTED!!  YOU ARE NOT ALONE!!  We are here to help in anyway you can!  Kilo will be sooo glad to jave that bum leg gone!!

Hugs

Sally and Alumni Happy Hannah and Merry Myrtle and Frankie too   

Thank you so much for all the good information.  I updated my original post. After arriving at the Hospital for Kilo’s appointment the doctor and his senior doctor conferred and decided at this time to postpone the amputation and just go in again and remove as much of the tumor as they can. At this time Kilo has shown no pain and the type of tumor he has does not spread to other parts of the body.  This will give us more a chance to learn and be better prepared in the future if amputation does have to be made.  I’m relieved as so many things need to have been in place to insure the best rehab in place for Kilo when amputation does have to be done.  I will be retired in another year and be able to give Kilo constant care if he does have to eventually have the leg amputated.  Again thanks for all your input.

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8 November 2018 - 2:32 pm
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jerry said
Anita, welcome! We are so sorry about Kiko but very glad you found our community! We will do our best to help make the recovery as easy as possible.

You definitely made a good decision for Kiko. Sometimes that kind of cancer is just impossible to control with surgical resections and you have to pull out the big guns. As scary as amputation is, at least you can both put the cancer behind you and move on.

I know Admin talked to you today in the Tripawds Cat and gave you lots of good tips. Be sure to also check out our Tripawds e-books library, and holler with any questions at all. We are here for you!  

Thank you Jerry.  Kilo’s amputation has been put off.  I updated my original post.  I’ll be learning more on the rehab for tripawds for the future if it comes to that in Kilo’s life.  The doctors decided after re-examining Kilo this morning that for now to remove the benign tumor again and keep Kilo’s leg in place.  He has shown no ill effects of pain or any lameness caused by these types of tumors which was a factor in their decision today.  Thanks again and thank you for your work on this website to help people like us know we are not alone. heart

The Rainbow Bridge

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8 November 2018 - 4:33 pm
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Well anytime an amputation can be avoided in the best interests of the animal that is GREAT NEWS!! Sounds like your vets are pawesome and super conscientious. Seriously glad to hear that he’s doing well.

We will all keep our paws crossed for many great years on all four.

I hope we don’t hear from you again 😉 but if we do, you are always welcome here. Thank you for the pupdate!

It's better to hop on three legs than to limp on four.™
Latest Tripawds News
Read my story here.

Support the Tripawds Foundation!

Virginia
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8 November 2018 - 7:02 pm
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Talk about a roller coaster ride!  WOW!!   Looks like you can get off that crazy ride now and proceed with having to do amputations,  GREAT NEWS INDEED!!!

Thanks for updating us.  Let us know how he’s  doing  as he heals from this surgery over the next several days, or however long it takes to get back to “normalcy”.  We’ll be cheering for Kilo for a FULL recovery!

Hugs!

Sally and Alumni Happy Hannah and Merry Myrtle and Frankie too!

Happy Hannah had a glorious additional bonus time of over one yr & two months after amp for osteo! She made me laugh everyday! Joined April's Angels after send off meal of steak, ice cream, M&Ms & deer poop!

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