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Caring for a Three Legged Dog or Cat

Tripawds is the place to learn how to care for a three legged dog or cat, with answers about dog leg amputation, and cat amputation recovery from many years of member experiences.
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How long did your dog live after amputation/chemo?
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Member Since:
20 December 2016
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20 December 2016 - 1:53 pm
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How long did your dog live after amputation/chemo?

On The Road


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24 September 2009
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20 December 2016 - 2:00 pm
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Welcome! What's your dog's name? What breed, age & size? Why the amputation?

Every dog is different. Amputations occur for numerous different reasons, and all come with a wide variety of prognoses. We have had members with dogs fighting cancer live more than five years. Others without have survived a few weeks.

While you wait for members to chime in—and they will soon—consider reviewing the results of the Tripawds Quality of Life Survey from a couple years ago. After alll, it is all about quality of life now, not quantity. Dog's can't tell time...

Tripawds Quality of Life Survey Tells All

Please tell us more about your pup. Your future forum posts will not require moderation. And start here for help navigating the many helpful resources this community has to offer.

Tripawds Founders Jim and Rene
tripawds.com | tripawds.org | bemoredog.net | triday.pet

Member Since:
6 August 2016
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20 December 2016 - 7:43 pm
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Hi,

MySweetTed's story is a little different.  His name was Ted; He was a rescue that we were told was Lab/Shar Pei mix (definitely Lab and definitely Shar Pei...and maybe something else mixed in there); he was ~8 1/2 years old when diagnosed; and he was about 73 lbs. Oh, and the most joyful bundle of JOY that I've ever met (just had to throw that in there).

He was diagnosed in March of 2016 with Osteosarcoma in his Ulna.  We tried to save the leg with an ulnectomy. ~ 3 months later he had soft tissue sarcoma in the leg. We amputated in early August.  He recovered with no complications and bounced, and bounced, and bounced until mid November.  We discovered Mets in his lungs in early November (although I suspected them earlier) and he died on 30 November.  He had no chemo.  From DIAGNOSIS to when he crossed the bridge was 8 very good months.

I would be very interested to see what the demographics are on breeds with osteosarcoma on this site.

Livermore, CA




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20 December 2016 - 7:55 pm
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My pug Maggie lost her left rear leg to mast cell cancer.  Because of lymph node involvement discovered after the surgery she was given 6 to 9 months WITH chemo.  Mag completed 6 months of chemo (normal for mast cell cancer) and lived almost 4 years.  She did not pass from mast cell but another type of cancer.

What type of cancer are you dealing with?  Tell us more about your pup.

Karen and the Spirit Pug Girls

Tri-pug Maggie survived a 4.5 year mast cell cancer battle only to be lost to oral melanoma.

1999 to 2010

 

              Maggie's Story                  Amputation and Chemo

Michigan
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20 December 2016 - 9:17 pm
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Murphy is a retriever mix and was 7 years old when he had his surgery.  He was diagnosed with histiocytic sarcoma, and the lymph node they removed at the time of surgery was positive, which meant that is had probably already spread.  His prognosis with chemo was 12-18 months "if we were lucky."  He received 6 doses of CCNU.  Murphy will be 11 next month, and it has been 3 years 8 months since his surgery.  His last chest x-ray was in September, and his lungs were still clear.  He still happily chases squirrels around the yard and loves to lay in the snow or sun. heart

Donna

Donna, Glenn & Murphy 

Murphy had his right front leg amputated due to histiocytic sarcoma at 7 years old. He survived 4 years, 2 months & 1 week, only to be taken by hemangiosarcoma at 11 1/2 years 6/12/17  
Read about Murphy's Life on Three Legs

Donna.png

Member Since:
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20 December 2016 - 10:26 pm
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Otis was diagnosed with osteosarcoma in his front leg when it broke.  His amputation was February 9, followed by 4 rounds of carboplatin.  He passed just short of 7 months post-amp.  His decline was very sudden - his quality of life was excellent until the evening before he passed.  Even though we did not get as much time as others, they were very good months and I have absolutely no regrets.

Otis - 106 pound lab/Dane mix, lost his right front leg to osteosarcoma on Febuary 9, 2016.  Four rounds of carboplatin completed in April, 2016.  Lung mets August 25, 2016.  Said goodbye too soon on September 4, 2016.   Lost his adopted sister, Tess, suddenly on October 9, 2016. likely due to hemangiosarcoma.  

Wherever they are, they are together.

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20 December 2016 - 10:57 pm
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Heffalump was a TWOPawd ( very rare indeed) who was a middle aged Great PYR ( a rescue so no definite age) who was diagnosed with OSA and who had 8 very happy months being himself before the OSA spread to his spleen ( another rarity). Even after becoming a TWOPawd, I never regretted our decision. He was a very happy boy! Now his successor, the WonderPyr CharlieBear, may be faced with an amp and radiation and chemo and, and, and... each of my boys is different but I would always make the decision to get rid of pain rather than not if I could. Jerry reminded me of that the other day!

Germany
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21 December 2016 - 12:59 am
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@mysweetted: demographics would be interesting, indeed. Literature and vets like to say that, while osteosarcoma can happen to any dog, more at risk are males between 7 and 10. Or so I heard. Definitely true in our case. prolonged lifespan with chemo and so on.

from my experience from the last twelve (yeah, 12!! 🙂 ) months, I would second this. However, I also just met a girl whose dog was diagnosed and amputed and chemo-treated with no visible mets only to have mets just 3 months later. so there go statistics...

Guardian of Manni the Wonderdog. -Or was it the other way around?
Osteo and amputation in Dec 2015. Second, inoperable, primary osteosarcoma found in June 2017.
The end of our adventures came Dec 10, 2017. 2 years to the day.

Manni's blog -dogblog-

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21 December 2016 - 4:49 am
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For those into demographics, I am doing the EMBARK DNA test with Gator.  It is more expensive then the standard "breed identifier" tests, and takes a long time for results (two months).  But it is affiliated with Cornell University and if you opt in, they are building a doggie DNA database to try to track genetic diseases.  Might be hard to do if you are already fighting cancer - lots of cute chirpy messages and some simple surveys to fill out, but building this database seems an important scientific step to me.  You also get your dog's full genetic breakdown, so can work with your vet on preventative care.

Otis - 106 pound lab/Dane mix, lost his right front leg to osteosarcoma on Febuary 9, 2016.  Four rounds of carboplatin completed in April, 2016.  Lung mets August 25, 2016.  Said goodbye too soon on September 4, 2016.   Lost his adopted sister, Tess, suddenly on October 9, 2016. likely due to hemangiosarcoma.  

Wherever they are, they are together.

Germany
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21 December 2016 - 6:05 am
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I am a little apprehensive when it comes to the whole DNA testing thing. It sounds great that they are looking for DNA markers for genetic diseases and I am all for it. However, I had Manni's DNA sent in to see what breeds contributed to that beautiful dog and what we got back was a mix of, and I am not kidding: Border Terrier, Yorkshire and Chihuahua. I don't know if you've seen his pictures, but

Seriously????

( and yes, I did go with a "renowned" company)

Guardian of Manni the Wonderdog. -Or was it the other way around?
Osteo and amputation in Dec 2015. Second, inoperable, primary osteosarcoma found in June 2017.
The end of our adventures came Dec 10, 2017. 2 years to the day.

Manni's blog -dogblog-

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15 July 2016
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21 December 2016 - 10:41 am
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Milo limped on July 2.  He was almost 10.  An Australian Labradoodle.  Neutered at 8 weeks.  (I've heard that is also a correlator, early neutering.)

He had very thorough pre-amp testing to get him qualified for a clinical trial for osteosarcoma.  Most dogs don't qualify, but he still had clear lungs, spleen, and liver 2 days before amputation.  Lymph nodes clear at amputation.  A certain telltale liver enzyme was nice and low.  Everything looked bright!

Full pathology of the leg after amputation revealed he had Giant Cell osteosarcoma.  Very rare.  He had a mitotic index of "40 something".   That means 40+% of his cancer cells were dividing at a given time.  His cells were doubling every other day.  Good mitotic index numbers are single digit.  Over 10 is aggressive.  The scale ends at 21+.

Milo bounced back after the amputation, including an awesome trip to Baltimore where he "brought the joy" to strangers as he bounced through city streets at midnight, and met kids at an outdoor cafe in the morning.  It all still seemed bright.

But it wasn't.  Late September his breathing was labored, and he crossed on Oct 6, 10 weeks post-amputation.

His grandfather the incredible stud muffin just passed at age 13 this spring.  We also met his grandmother's littermate who is 13 and going strong.  He had decent genetics.  We now have a new baby who shares a few genetic lines with him.   

London, UK


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21 December 2016 - 11:04 am
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However, I had Manni's DNA sent in to see what breeds contributed to that beautiful dog and what we got back was a mix of, and I am not kidding: Border Terrier, Yorkshire and Chihuahua

laughing laughing laughing It sounds as though there was maybe some sort of mix up at the lab. It can throw up the odd weird result (my vet says the accuracy is around 86%, though this was several years ago and the tests are improving all the time). I've had Meg tested twice by different companies and they both came up with the same result – around 25% Rottweiler, which I'd never seen until they said it, but actually it's obvious when you know, both physically and in terms of behaviour. The other breeds were too small to measure (she is a full on mutt).

I'm also doing the Embark test, after learning about it from Christine. I'm very excited to learn more about Meg's genetic markers (she has elbow dysplasia and IOHC) and also to contribute to their research database.

Meg, Mutt, aged around 13, adopted 31/12/2009. Sudden explosive right elbow fracture 06/12 (caused by IOHC), diagnosed with End Stage Arthritis 03/15, Total Elbow Replacement 08/15, problems with healing leading to skin graft & skin flap surgery, Chronic Infection leading to implant breakdown. Became a Tripawd 9th March 2016. 
Lives with Mum, Clare, watched over by Angel Pie and Angel Billie
My life as a MEG-A-STAR 


London, UK


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21 December 2016 - 11:22 am
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To answer the original question, a friend of mine's Rottweiler cross died recently at the age of sixteen, when her cancer returned  NINE YEARS after she was diagnosed with Osteosarcoma. She was treated with amputation but no chemo and enjoyed a great quality of life until the cancer returned and they decided it was time to let her go.

Meg, Mutt, aged around 13, adopted 31/12/2009. Sudden explosive right elbow fracture 06/12 (caused by IOHC), diagnosed with End Stage Arthritis 03/15, Total Elbow Replacement 08/15, problems with healing leading to skin graft & skin flap surgery, Chronic Infection leading to implant breakdown. Became a Tripawd 9th March 2016. 
Lives with Mum, Clare, watched over by Angel Pie and Angel Billie
My life as a MEG-A-STAR 




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22 December 2016 - 12:39 pm
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My girl Eurydice was diagnosed at the end of April and had her surgery May 4th.

She had 6 sessions of carboplatin followed by a litle over one month of metronomic therapy.

At that point we found 3 little tumours in her lungs and stopped metronomics and started another type of IV chemo. 

She had her first 2 sessions of doxorubicin so far, out of 5 sessions.

Eurydice is doing great, full of energy and enjoying life 7 1/2 months after surgery.

She will have another PET scan at the end of January to access the situation.

Sending you and your sweetie a big hug and cuddles and lots of pawsitive energy 😘💞🐶

Eurydice 77kg/170lb Great Dane limping end of April 2016, amputation (right front leg/osteosarcoma) 4 May 2016 6 courses of carboplatin followed by metronomic therapy, lung mets found 30 Nov 2016. 3 courses of doxorubicin, PET scan 26 Jan 2017 showed more mets so stopped chemo. Holistic route April 2017. Lung X-ray 5 May 2017 showed several tennis ball size mets, started cortisone and diuretics. Miss Cow earned her XXL silver wings 12 June 2017, 13 months and 1 week after amputation and 6 1/2 months after lung mets, she was the goofiest dawg ever and is now happily flying from cloud to cloud woof woofing away :-) 

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22 December 2016 - 12:40 pm
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573la said
How long did your dog live after amputation/chemo?  

Callie was diagnosed and had her front limb amputated 9/11/15, she is now 15 months post amputation and diagnosis.  

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