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Jerry
Founder & Chief Fun Officer

Admin
Chief Technical Guru

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Betaman
Quality Assurance Manager

Tripawds 501c3 Foundation

Foundation
Tripawds Foundation 501c3 Charity

KillBarney
Tripawds Nemesis & Tour Guide

Tripawds E-books Library Fast Dog Amputation Help

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Researching keywords? Search all blogs here!
Name: Mustkill Barney
Website: http://killbarney.tripawds.com
Bio: Barney was always a favorite of Jerry … and his greatest nemesis.

Recent Posts (All Posts)

KillBarney Tour Taking A Break
After much deliberation at Tripawds HQ, the KillBarney Tour has been suspended until further notice. [captio (More)
The Devil Went Down to Georgia
What a tough little dino that Barney is, nothing will stop him! After surviving the most insane adventures EVER with Happy Hann (More)
Barney Parties with Happy Hannah!
Happy Hannah had a pre-party for her one year More)
Word From Barney At Last!
If you're as anxious to hear about Barney's latest adventures as we have been, check this out from More)
Barney Helps Wyatt Heal
While we wait for news about the next adventures of the KillBarney Tour, Spirit Jerry's More)


5 thoughts on “Ouch.”

  1. Tikka had a back leg remove in December 2018. She has done well but we knew the other lag was arthritic and has become much worse. She had trouble walking at all yesterday. Now feel like we need to investigate when carts and don’t even know where to start. I have read what is here but the posts are older. Any new information out there?

    Reply
    • The #1 thing you can do for Tikka is consult with a certified canine rehab therapist for proper evaluation, therapy recommendations, and proper selection and fitting if it is determined the time has come for wheels. Visit a CCRT or CCRP and the Tripawds Foundation can even pay for your first visit! Self-prescribing a wheelchair or improper fit can do more harm than good. And yes, there are many more recent articles, videos and podcast interviews about wheelchairs for Tripawds here.

      Reply
  2. Just found this site,my dog had a rt.frt. amputation about 2 weeks ago,she is doing well except for wanting to lick the stitches (which are probably itching like crazy by now) but was looking for something for her to wear that might discourage the licking

    Reply
  3. Three days ago, we got the news that our 7-year-old Saint Bernard has bone cancer. A month ago, she’d started limping on her left front leg. We thought it was just a sprain from exerting herself as we recently got a puppy, and the two love to play rough. Our vet also thought it was a minor sprain. But the limp didn’t go away and suddenly it worsened overnight. So we took her to the vet again and x-rays revealed that she has bone cancer.

    Our vet said she’s not a good candidate for an amputation as she has hip dysplasia and is very large at 175 pounds. He said she only has, at most, two months to live.

    My family and I are absolutely devastated. We love her so much. We’ve decided to take this one day at a time and euthanize her when her quality of life declines.

    Reply
  4. My precious Yorkie kept gaining weight….then his belly started bulging and getting hard. I thought it was all a weight problem and kept cutting back on his food and adding more no-salt green beans. Two weeks ago he started having a problem breathing. I took him right to my vet who ran xrays and an ultra sound. They said he had cancer in his chest and spleen and the prognosis was not good. They put him on prednisone, but 7 days later he had deteriorated to the point of not being able to lay down and his respiration was 130 per minute. There was no way he could continue to suffer that much. I had to have him put to sleep (heart breaking) but I wish I had been told how rapid he would deteriorate. His suffering was horrible.

    Reply
    • Carol, you have our deepest condolences. Cancer can be so mean, we are so sorry it took your sweet pup from you. Someday, the memories you shared will bring you comfort. For now as you cope with the heartache of saying goodbye, know that your sweet pup is never far from your side in spirit. (((hugs)))

      Reply
  5. I was forced into chipping my Doberman. Now he sleeps al the time and loses bags full of hair weekly! I think he is dying but I can’t afford a vet.

    Reply
    • Smg, it is almost 100% likely that the chip is not related to your dog’s health issues. Please call your nearest Humane Society to inquire about local charitable clinics that can help with his care so you can find out what’s going on. Our Tripawds Financial Resources List might also point you to some organizations. Good luck.

      Reply
  6. Ari shows that, just because a dog loses a leg, doesn’t mean that they have to retire to the couch! I have an 11 year of flat-coated retriever named Neon who lost his left front leg to cancer 2 years ago. He was a performance dog prior to diagnosis and has bounced back from the treatment still able to do just about everything he did before! He runs NADAC agility, field and does tracking. We were working towards our AKC novice obedience title when this happened and were not able to finish due to the rules set forth by the AKC regarding lameness. I feel cheated that he is not able to finish what he is capable of finishing just as well as a dog that still has all 4 legs. Kudos to you and please keep fighting. Our tri-paws as so worth it!

    Reply
    • Thank you penny! I won’t stop until trpawds can compete in Rally and Obedience! Would you be interested in writing a letter/email to the AKC I’m working with to support this mission? If so I can send you AKC contact info!

      Reply
  7. Ari is one of the most agile dogs I ever met. She can hold her own with most dogs. She is smart and learns fast. I should know Her brother is my pup.

    Reply
  8. I LOVE this! And I LOVE my painting 🙂 Kaiserin and mama even go one step further! On the back of our beautiful painting is a picture of Kaiserin actually painting it, and her pawprint with a thank you note.

    Just amazing work!

    Jackie and Huck

    Reply
    • Thank you for buying one of her paintings Jackie! That is adorable about how they customize the back of the painting! Can you send me a photo so I can share that? Pawesome!

      Reply
  9. Is it normal that my dog wot ACL tear wont even get u to eat or pee? He is in that much pain!.. I don’t know what to give him. would this work?

    Reply
  10. My 13 year old American Pitbull was diagnosed with lymphoma.
    I did some looking and LDN (Low Dose Naltrexone) looked somewhat hopeful and contacted my vet due to Chemo not being an option.
    Was told it takes several weeks of dosing to know if it has had any positive results. And that Vets aren’t using this as a treatment at this time.
    But our vet went ahead and called a compounding pharmacy to make 5mg doses for him 1x daily along with 20mg 1x day 1x night Prednisone and then after 7 days go to 10mg of Prednisone daily but continue the 5mg LDN dose.

    He had very swollen nodes on his neck and then on chest and rear legs the Prednisone has made them smaller but even before he was taking any meds he continued to eat and play. He did throw up once in a while but not continually. I know he was not feeling well but he does well hiding it.
    He seems to be holding down his food now still plays and the nodes have shrunk but this is the Prednisone not the LDN.
    So I’m hoping for a miracle that between both meds he can be with us longer.

    Reply
  11. We lost our dog post amputation!
    Didn’t receive message of his death until next morning.
    Should we order an autopsy? What other information should we obtain from the vet.

    Reply
    • Bill, our hearts go out to you, we are so sorry for your loss. Please join our Discussion Forums if you want to talk further about this OK? Meanwhile, in the vet field an autopsy is known as a “necropsy.” I’m not sure how long ago your pup passed away but if it wasn’t ordered immediately upon his death, then it may be too late to have one done. Call your vet to ask. As far as we know, that is the only way to determine exactly what happened. Our deepest condolences to you and your family.

      Reply
  12. We had a very similar situation with our cat. Same leg amputation, though part of his femur was left. For the first few days he was listless and barely ate at all and I think maybe it was a combination of anesthesia wearing off and the copious amount of drugs he was on. He’s still on the same drugs now, but a week later he’s VERY much improved. My best advice is to consult with your vet if you’re worried. We’ve been feeding him Hill Science Diet Urgent Care a/d on the advice of our vet, since it’s very calorie dense and he doesn’t have to eat as much to get the calories he needs.

    Reply
  13. Such an interesting point about leaving as much of limb behind as possible. I adopted a tripawd who came with he front right amputated. She was left with a little “stump”. The stump has been causing lots of issue (fluid buildup from bone hitting hard surfaces, irritation from harness drubbing on stump, rug burn from dragging stump on carpet, etc.). I had been wondering if it would be beneficial to get rid of her stump. I had not thought about any of the benefits her stump could be providing.

    Reply
    • Hi Eileen, great feedback. We’ve heard of many similar issues from members whose Tripawds have remaining stumps. Sometimes people’s animals go through an “amputation correction” when the stump just won’t heal. I do believe that while leaving as much of the limb behind as possible is good, if the client knows they want to pursue a prosthesis. But the complication rate is high if the surgeon doesn’t know how to properly close the amputation wound to reduce problems like what you’re seeing. Check out our blog post about full or partial limb amputations.

      Reply
  14. Hi, I’m Martha. I’m a newby here, and I have a 3 year old Black Lab/Rot mix who is Day 5 post op for the amputation of her back right leg. We’ve give her pumpkin pulp, and broth, and other fiber-rich things. And she has not pooped yet. 🙁 I’m not sure if she’s just not quite sure how to squat correctly, I have a sling to support her I’m just kinda lost on how to help it along. She’s had a huge appetite, so I know it needs to come out. Any advice? This article was so helpful! Thank you

    Reply
    • Please consult your vet with serious concerns.

      A little olive oil in the food can help get things moving along, but please know that we are not vets! And be careful what you ask for…as Jerry’s vet told us, when they need to go, they’ll go. But five days is a long time for no poop if eating regularly.

      Reply
  15. Unfortunately my beautiful Otto the rott was only able to enjoy two and a half happy months with us after surgery before that monster, osteosarcoma, reared up again and spread to his lungs despite chemo.
    I don’t regret the surgery in the slightest! After the initial 2 week recovery period, I had my happy playful companion back again, swimming every day and playing with his favourite toys.

    Reply
  16. RESENTLY AS OF FRIDAY 6/3/2020 STARTED MY YORKIE ON PREDNISONE SHE A A MASS ON RIGHT SIDE OF NECK . HER REACTION IS STRANGE SHE SLEEPS A LOT SHE DOES THRIST BUT IS HARD FOR HER TO SWALLOW FOOD BUT SHE DOES EAT . I WILL NOT PUT HER THROUGH THIS VERY LONG SHE ONLY WEIGHS 41/2 POUNDS ASN IS 12 YEARS OLD . THE LOVE OF MY LIFE AFER I LOST MY HUSBAND. I HOPE TO KEEP HER LONGER BUT WILL NOT LET HER SUFFER. WE HAVE LOST ONE DOG AND MY SONS DOG AHD CANCER AND NOW MY AIDEN. THIS IS THE LAST STOP AND THE LAST HOPE WE KNOW HOW THIS WILL END.

    Reply
    • Our hearts go out to you and your Aiden, we are so sorry Janet. This is never easy and you have been through so much. We are keeping a candle lit in our hearts for your sweet pup and you.

      Reply
  17. My (very strong, vital & playful) 18 year old Maine Coon, Captain, just had his right rear leg amputated to the hip 3 days ago. I built him a ramp to get up and down from his chair and a small step to get in & out of the litter box. He’s getting around okay, and hustles it to his usual spot for feeding, but other than getting up for food and bathroom breaks he’s just sleeping constantly. I know his body is doing a lot of work to recover, but I’m worried because he is eating and drinking so much less than he used to. I’m giving him the most calorie dense foods I can but I’m worried about him getting adequate nutrition to fix himself. Is this a product of the pain meds? Or a sign of something else wrong? His stitches and skin look good and his eyes are still bright.

    Reply
    • Hi Captain and Magf, welcome. It’s natural to be concerned, amputation is not an easy journey. BUT, three days is not a long time after surgery, especially for a senior kitty. Try to picture yourself in his paws: most humans who just has a leg amputated would not be getting up and moving around, or too enthusiastic about anything, at this point. It may be a couple weeks before you see his sparkle come back, but try not to worry. Yes, the pain meds decrease appetite. Talk to your vet about trying an appetite stimulant, try making your own (scroll down for cat-specific tips) and be sure to check out our e-book, Cool Tips for Tripawd Cats for more tips. Also please join our Discussion Forums for lots of help from the community. See you there!

      Reply
  18. This is great information and will be very helpful. Sometimes cats aren’t sent home with an effective pain management plan.

    I’d like to add that Metacam for Cats in oral liquid form is prescribed in Canada, Europe, Australia and New Zealand. This .5 mg/ml meloxicam formula is not legally approved in the US yet recent clinical studies have failed to demonstrate impairment in renal function, even in cats with pre-existing renal disease. It’s proven to be effective and safe and cats find it palatable.

    Those residents outside the US may find that it’s prescribed, along with an opioid, following an amputation. Certainly a discussion with the vet about potential side effects of all medications could alleviate any concerns.

    Kerren

    Reply
  19. Ashes the Silver Surfer, my beautiful cat, just had his left front leg amputated today due to cancer. Other than that he is in great shape for a 14 year cat. The vet will call tomorrow morning to tell us if we should pick him up tomorrow or the next day. I’ve had pets most of my life but this my 1st amputee pet. Ashes is so amazing!

    Reply
  20. Hi Jerry we have a cat name Thomas that needs two surgeries or an Amputation however they say almost 2,000 dollars is there any programs to help with this his terrible watching and hearing him suffer we don’t wanna have to put him down and that’s the only other choice it seems it’s hurting us watching this . Please help idk if momma will handle it if she has to put him down . As she lost my dad 10 years ago and she getting very depressed worried about Tom Tom .

    Reply
  21. Our puppy had his front leg amputated at 14 weeks, almost 3 months ago. He just developed a seroma on his stump, and it became infected. The vet drained it today. Are there steps we should take to prevent a recurrence?

    Reply
    • Hi Nettie, sorry to hear that. It’s not terribly unusual for a seroma to happen this late after surgery but the infection is what I would be concerned about. Make sure your vet has the fluid tested for MRSA if it doesn’t clear up with an antibiotic (he should be on one now). Hope your pup gets well soon. Keep us posted in the Discussion Forums.

      Reply
  22. Why should you not sleep on the floor with your cat post-surgery?

    I ask as my feline friend had a front left leg amputation earlier this month. Normally, we sleep on the bed together which is roughly 2 feet off the ground. I tried sleeping on the couch while she slept on the floor but she kept staring at me all sad and I finally set up a spot on the floor and she’s slept with me each night.

    I’m hoping this isn’t bad!

    Reply
    • Hi Sydney, great question! Well, we’ve talked to vets who tell us that changing the sleeping routine can be stressful for both the Tripawd and the parent. I think if your cat is happy with you on the floor then it’s fine but the sooner you start to normalize the sleeping routine the better. Also consider pet steps so that your cat can get up and down from the bed safely.

      Reply
  23. I am new to the group. My dachshund had her right front leg amputation yesterday, and I am a nervous wreck. I’m not sure how to pick her up to take her outside, and she won’t stand up.

    Reply
  24. Oliver’s hooman. We are here for you, okay? We also have a TRIPAWDS HELPLINE , as well as the forums to help support you. 1 888 tripawd

    Reply
  25. Rocky is, indeed, brave, as is his hooman! Such an uplifting story! I love what you said, “He lost his leg, but he didn’t lose his sparkle,” Keep on rockin’ Rocky! We’re cheering for you!!
    Hugs
    Sally and Alumni Happy Hannah and Merry Myrtle and Frankie too!
    PS. I’m owned by a four legger Bull Mastiff who lost her site one/two years ago. You are doing am excellent job of caring for your handsome boy…..a very loved boy!❤

    Reply
  26. My dog, Lolli, 9 years old, just had her front left leg amputated 11 days ago. When she was 2 years old, she had TPLO surgery to repair torn CCL in her both back legs. For the first few days after amputation, she was doing well. She would walk around outside and even try to play with us. However, for the past few days, she won’t sleep. She just stands around at night and pants with her legs shaking. During the day she also just stands around, not knowing where to go. When she does lay down she looks uncomfortable, and sometimes gets up and yelps. We called the vet and they gave her anxiety medication, and it has helped a little bit. She isn’t panting or shaking as much, and she is sleeping more, but she will still yelp, pant, and drool every so often. Is she just taking longer to recover? Or should we be concerned?

    Reply
    • Sylvia, I’m so sorry, poor Lolli. Unfortunately, I believe you are describing classic pain signals and no amount of anxiety medication is going to control pain, but rather sedate her so she can’t complain about it. Did she get any kind of pain control after amputation? If so, what was it? Please call your vet ASAP and get a referral to a pain management specialist who can pinpoint the issue and help her get on the path to feeling good. If your vet doesn’t know who to refer you to, please reach out to us and we can locate one. Also, keep us posted on how she’s doing in the Discussion Forums OK?

      Reply
    • My dog seems to be doing the same. We are almost 1 week out of forelimb amputation, also history of TPLO in both rear. He did good yesterday and got up server all times. Last night he was laying on his surgical side and was unable to get up. Finally got moved around and whimpered. I am having a hard time determining where the pain is. It’s almost like he’s having pain in the rear leg. Did you ever figure anything out about your dog or did it resolve?

      Reply
  27. My yorkie had his right hind leg last night, called to check on him, said hes not doing well and I cabt see him..worried sick…

    Reply
    • Oliver’s Mom, I know you must be so worried but he’s in the best place right now. Many Tripawds need to stay longer in the clinic after surgery and the reason they asked you not to visit is because doing so can stress out an animal more than help, when you have to leave. Stay strong, keep calling and don’t give up, he will be home before you know it. Please post in our Discussion Forums so you can lean on us OK?

      Reply
  28. I am looking for the same. I wish there was more information. My dog lost her back leg when she was a year old its been 7 years now and it is taking a toll on her front same side leg. Getting her into the vet later this week.. She has been perfectly happy and healthy up to this point….

    Reply
  29. Hi My Morag a Scottish deerhound 5yrs had her right leg amputated on the 1st June due to osteosarcoma. She starts her chemo next Friday.

    Lovely encouraging stories from you all thank you. It’s been a traumatic time especially for Morag but she is doing great. So proud of her!

    I have been worried about the chemo so good to hear that it doesn’t sound too bad for them

    Sending my best wishes and Good luck to all your brave and courageous dogs.

    Reply
  30. Hello Ilona.
    Like your dear dog, ours is going through a complete personality change. It’s as though he is a cardboard cut out of the dog we know and love.
    His story began just over 5 weeks ago (He is a Lurcher by the way). He managed to fracture his hind leg badly and dislocate his ankle. He was operated on with a partial fusion and a plate. However, it all went wrong from there. Due to insufficient skin he had most of the plate exposed. The bandages caused bandage sores that were open and painful. Finally he got an infection in the bone where the plate was. The only only suitable option at this point was amputation. He is now suffering because the wound dressing has caused two splits in his skin that were bleeding and oozing (he has typical thin Lurcher skin). So, we now have to go and have these redressed every other day. He no longer sleeps at night and whines and moans. Yet during the day he is quiet. Since the day of the accident we have not seen his personality return. The vet doesn’t think its due to pain – which leaves anxiety as the other option. Poor boy.
    I found reading your blog interesting – did your vet give you any indication on which medication might cause the issues you had?. I am wondering if it’s the same with our boy.
    I’m so pleased that eventually your boy pulled through and returned to you as his happy contented self again. We look forward to that day too. xx

    Reply
    • Scoobs & family, I”m sorry to hear that things are ruff right now. Please get another opinion on the situation. When a dog gives signals like what you described, those behaviors are likely due to pain issues. Sometimes vets are not current on pain management and your boy could be missing out on important relief to help him get his life back. Please keep us posted in the Forums OK?

      Reply
  31. I too debated about my decision to amputate my 8 1/2 yr old lab’s rear leg due to osteosarcoma. When he came back from a short vet stay after the amputation, he wasn’t himself. It didn’t seem to be pain, but he didn’t act as he normally would have and it didn’t improve for weeks. He was being medicated to pain and my husband & I questioned if the meds were causing the differences in his personality. After speaking to his vet who suggested we just stop all the meds, we instead started decreasing each med one at a time. Within in a short amount of time, you could start to see his personality emerge again. It took about a month to decrease all of his medications once we started, but we had our wonderful dog back! It’s now been 27 months since diagnosis and amputation and he’s now 11 and going strong.

    Reply
    • Awwww Ilona thank you so so much for sharing your dog’s story! We are so hoppy that he is doing so much better. Feel free to send us a Tripawd Tuesday spotlight or chime into the Forums, we would love to get to know you two.

      Reply
  32. My kitty got his front leg amputated a few years back. He’s always been quite athletic and that has not changed. He’s still quite capable but he does fall occasionally and can’t quite do everything the same as he used to. I’m having to move into a small studio apartment and I’m considering getting one of those top opening litter boxes but I’m just not sure if that’s a horrible idea for him? I know this isn’t a new amputee question but I would love some advice! Thanks.

    Reply
  33. My gorgeous little 5 month pup had to get his leg amputated last weekend, I did everything to keep him calm and rested but he still split his stitches to the bone , now he’s back in getting re-stitched for the third time as he had split them before he even left the vets the first time. This is so hard to see my gorgeous pup struggling so much, the vet said this time it could lead to complications, does anyone know what that means?

    Reply
    • Finn and George, I would ask your vet what they meant by that but generally speaking, when a wound doesn’t heal, the tissues surrounding it can die off, get infected and require a more serious surgery than just a re-stitching. Keep the cone on your pup at all costs. Best wishes to you two. Be sure to join our Discussion Forums for feedback from the community!

      Reply
  34. My dog had masectomy 1 year ago & one rear leg lynph node removed in March metastisized to lung. Several small tumors. Can she get electrochemo? How effective in the lungs. It is andenoma carcinoma – mammary cancer

    Reply
  35. Rene,
    So glad Wyatt’s dental issues were covered. Dental coverage varies so much company to company and it is one of the most commonly treated areas of the body vets see day in and day out. So, getting good coverage is vital IMHO.

    Reply
    • Thanks Dr. Kenney, we never would have imagined that dental coverage can vary. That’s another great reason for all of us to research everything possible before committing to a policy. Keep up the great work, thanks for all you do!

      Reply
  36. Our 6 year old lab mix was diagnosed with a grade 2 soft tissue sarcoma on his left hind leg. The only potential cure is an amputation for him but he also has severe hip dysplasia. So, if he gets the amputation then we will also likely be faced with hip replacement soon to follow. The alternative is getting the hip replacement, allow him 2 weeks to heal and then do the amputation. We truly feel he still has so much good life to live but surgeries have risks and only the final pathology after the amputation will show if the entire cancer was removed or if it even spread. Anyone else ever have a similar situation?

    Reply
    • Hi Steven, we are sorry to hear about your pup but glad you found us. Please consider posting in our Discussion Forums for more feedback from the community. Meanwhile, if you haven’t gotten a second or third opinion from a board-certified orthopedic vet surgeon, now is the time. They can give you a good idea as to whether or not a future surgery may be needed. Our own Wyatt Ray, a rear-leg Tripawd for 10 years, has hip dysplasia and that hasn’t kept him from having a good quality of life. See you in the Forums we hope!

      Reply
  37. Thank for sharing…my Sasha girl a beautiful Doberman I adopted 8 years ago was just diagnosed…I am beside myself..Your stories have helped me come to terms with it. She’s pain free and still active but I know the inevitable is coming.

    Reply
    • Bobby we are deeply sorry you got the bad news. We understand how you feel and are so glad you found us. There is hope for better days and a long, happy life. Please join us in the Discussion Forums where we can help you along and you can meet members like Dobemom, Nitro’s human. I know she would love to meet you two. See you there OK?

      Reply
  38. My 3 month old puppy lost 1 hind leg due to a car accident. He also has a small crack in his pelvis. He is a blue heeler. When I first brought him home he was crazy, barking incessantly in the kennel. When I took off his cone to eat or drink he was going mad biting and licking his body not just his stitches. He was given tramadol and carprofin. I was going crazy as he was going crazy!!! On the 3rd day of this the vet took him off tramodal. I had to leave him with first overnight as I had to go to a funeral. When we came back he seemed calmer, but now he’s not eating, so I haven’t been able to give him the carpofin. And I’m out of it, the vet said to crush it and put it in a seringe (I decided to go ahead and try the tramodal since I’m out of the carpofin). I’ll get more medicine tomorrow tho. Anyway, does this sound normal to you? I’m wondering if he just didn’t get his body to rest at all for 3+ days due to his craziness with the drugs in his system.

    Reply
  39. I have a very active terrier Chihuahua mix that has bad knees. She’s only 7 right now but already has level 4 arthritis in both knees and the vet said she’s going to need surgery in the next few years. I was wondering if it would be possible to get prosthetics that would attatch to her femurs if her legs were amputated at the knees? I live in the country and feel like wheels would be harder on her to get around than having prosthetic legs.

    Reply
    • Hi Mickayla, sorry to hear about your pup. Before resorting to orthopedic surgery or amputation of both legs, which is pretty drastic and probably not necessary, we recommend getting a second opinion from a board-certified orthopedic surgeon and a canine rehabilitation therapist to find out why your dog has the arthritis and how to help alleviate it without surgery, hopefully. Two amputated legs is definitely harder for a dog to adjust to than a set of wheels. Best wishes to you and your pup.

      Reply
  40. This is such a sweet story and with ADORABLE pictures!! Obviously the fact that your husband became an amputee jad to be a rough time.

    But clearly this is a family that makes the best of any situation and in a way that expands your circle of compassion to all beings.

    Loved the phrase “friend shaped”….priceless.❤

    Hugs
    Sally and Alumni Happy Hannah and Merry Myrtle and Frankie too!

    Reply
  41. Bravo! What an honor to have Dr Dressler recognize Tripawds as the go to aite for support on three-legged dogs and cats!

    Reply
  42. That is just so wonderful that they both found their forever home. And it takes a special person to open their home to a rescue, especially two, and tripawds at that.

    Please tell your husband thank you for his service.

    Reply
  43. Thanks for sharing Jerry and fine tuning my radar. Your words will help me be proactive in caring for Jake. Think of all the animals who’s lives you have helped make better!!

    Reply
    • You are so welcome! Jake is very fortunate to have you looking out for him. By being part of this community, we can all help animals on 3 live better lives!

      Reply
  44. I loved reading about Wyatt, thanks. He is so handsome!
    Thanks for taking the time to share your experience of Wyatt as a geriatric tripawd. What I love so much is the personal touch and the honesty. You don’t sugar coat the effects on a dog’s body living with only 3 legs. You make me want to do everything I can for Jake. Now I can’t wait to read part 2!

    Reply
    • Aww thanks, I”ll tell Wyatt what you said. We only want to be honest about what to expect as a Tripawd ages. It’s not bad, it’s just different and an honor to be able to help him when he needs it most. Jake is going to have a long, healthy strong life thanks to you!

      Reply
  45. Hello all! I unfortunately am having an extremely difficult time as I just had to put my dog maya down. She had osteosarcoma and had her front leg amputated after fracturing it. So we found the cancer late. However maya was such a strong girl. She went through chemo about 2 months after that. We had so many financial problems through this whole thing which makes me so mad cause the vets just care about money never mind our babies lives and suffering. But despite everything maya made it just over a year. Through half of that time she became paralyzed in the hind legs. We thought it was temporary because she did have some feelings. So we started physical therapy. She was doing great and so close to walking again but then she got really bad pressure sores, UTI’s and then lost feeling again. She had a fall so we thought she hit her back and caused trauma because she had a big bump. Now I can’t stop thinking she had cancer back that whole time which kills me. I have such guilt. My girl was everything to me. Sorry for writing so long but I’m lost. I really want to have peace of mind that I didn’t miss something but I have a feeling I did. I would have given my last breath for my girl.

    Reply
  46. Thanks for this advice. We just got home from the vet today. Our first potty trip was excruciating. My Macy Mae did the best she could but got tired – we took two breaks getting back inside. I definitely need this help!

    Reply
  47. I really appreciate reading all of this! Tomorrow my girl and I start of first of 5 treatments. Hoping for the best! She was diagnosed with osteosarcoma middle of March fours days later had her hind leg amputated. Has healed really well and is getting back to herself again. My only regret at this point was not amputating the leg when she broke it as a pup. Had I known our odds of developing osteosarcoma at that that time I would have. Poor girl has had too many surgeries I just want her to be happy and enjoy her life one day at a time.

    Reply
    • Hello S.L. Sure! Check out our Vet Rehab Reimbursement announcement, we have links to different provider directories. As for chiropractic care, that’s something that you and your rehab practitioner should decide on. I would always see a rehab therapist first, that way they can point you to the best modalities for your Tripawd. Good luck and keep us posted!

      Reply
  48. When Biggz was 3yrs old he was hit by a van that was going 50-55mph. A fire chief saw the whole thing happen,and pretty much saved my dog. The woman in the van didn’t even stop!!! The chief said she was texting on her phone. As he’s helping my dog,another volunteer fighter stopped and ended up taking him 20 miles away to an emergency vet. He (Biggz) couldn’t use his back legs. At that time he weighed 140lbs. Next morning I get a call and I find all of this out. Well,when I took him to our vet a week later,he told me to save $ cause he was thinking of taking his rear left leg. Well,Biggz was telling him in his voice”bull!!!! I’m going to show you”!!!! He was walking that night!!!
    He is a Rott n Lab. He is now 11 yrs old,has used his back left leg like a kickstand but can run n jump like he was normal. Until,2 weeks ago. My HAPPY ALL THE TIME DOG isn’t so happy. The vet thinks its bone cancer. And,happens to be on his left front leg.
    I don’t know what to do. He’s on pain meds n gabapentin. I’m on a fixed income and don’t have a clue how much this is going to cost. They wont take payments….☹
    I’ve had him since he was 4 months old,after I put my 15 yrs old ‘Rock’ to rest.

    Reply
  49. Thank you so much for sharing. It is a great help to hear other’s going through the same unknowns. We all want what’s best for our furbabies and getting advice and recommendations from someone who has or is going through the same challenges sparks a new hope for others. Best of luck to you and we look forward to hearing more from Wyatt Ray. What an inspiration. Love you guys.

    Reply
    • You are so welcome Judy! We will keep you posted on Wyatt, and hope you will do the same for Buffy. Thank you so much for stopping by and being such a pawesome supporter!

      Reply
  50. This is a nice story. My dog, Bobby, had his lower jaw removed due to cancer and we are wondering if we should have just let him go but it just wasn’t his time – he was such a lively dog. 3 weeks on from the mandibulectomy he seems to be healing well – a bit depressed until he goes out for a walk – but hopefully we will have some months longer with him and he will feel good in himself until it’s his time

    Reply
    • Morag it is so nice to hear from you. I’m so sorry about the diagnosis. How is Bobby doing? And what kind of cancer was he diagnosed with?

      We hope with all our hearts that he has many good times ahead. Please keep us posted.

      Thanks for all your support and love to the Tripawds community!

      Rene, Jim, Wyatt Ray, Spirit Jerry & the Tripawds Nation

      Reply
      • Bobby’s doing well, thanks. It was a melanoma in his jaw. I know he’s not a tripawd (it’s my cat Wubba that’s the tripawd) but it was nice to read the post where someone else took the chance of more time for an older dog.

  51. My pit had her front left leg amputed due to Osteocarcoma.
    She is coming home today and I need any suggestions on assisting her in any way possible.

    Reply
  52. I have a Terrier mix that recently had to have her one of her hind legs removed. She will wake up yelping. I don’t know if this is due to phantom pain, but she has never done it before the surgery or even after she hurt her leg.

    Reply
    • Elizabeth, this could be phantom pain. Let your vet know about it and make sure your pup gets treatment. Dry needling acupuncture combined with pain control like Gabapentin is shown to make a big difference. Keep us posted in the Discussion Forums on how she’s doing.

      Reply
  53. we have a 25 pound 13 year old Sheltie; she’s in good health, except for some arthritic back legs/hip area….we take slow walks, and at times she will stumble. She’s on Rymadel for the inflammation; the small heating device looks promising… can you recommend an item to help us apply heat? (she is indoors & outdoors – when outdoors she has a wonderful heating pad in her house)..

    Reply
  54. Just had rear rigth leg removed from my 10 year golden yesterday.
    He cant stand on the one leg for long at all. He is 80lb long hair. Which harness do you think well be best for him to help get up walk and stand to pee

    Reply
  55. Hi There!

    My dog Calvin got his poor tailed slammed in a self closing metal door on March 7th. I quickly ran him to the vets and he was able to get sedated and have surgery right away! The vet tried to save the tail but it was almost a 360 wound. Also it wasn’t the full tail just part of the end. So we continued with his meds and follow up appointments after and they seems great. Sadly yesterday he had to get surgery to get some of his tail amputated as that part didn’t end up surviving. The surgery went well but seemed like the tail was leaking a bit more than we wanted so today we took him in again (March 30) and he needed to get some more stitches. He is home now but the tail is cold! Is this normal after an amputation? It’s really freaking me out!

    Reply
    • Hi Madisan. Sorry to hear about Calvin but glad he’s on the mend. This is a question best left to your veterinarian I’m afraid. Please let us know what they say. Wish we could help you more with that but better safe than sorry right? All the best to you both.

      Reply
  56. Hello,
    I was unaware of the advice about adopting a tri-paw until reading your blog. I am a bit concerned for my handsome baby boy Zeus. He is 2 1/2 Years old German Shepherd Dog. I adopted him shortly after his left rear amputation at 10 months old. I didn’t know that he was an amputee when I went to see him at the shelter. I wasn’t able to get on the wait list to adopt him, as it was full. After a few days, I called and was put on the list. A half hour later, I received a call to come and get him.
    I will write more later but, he RUNS everywhere he goes indoors and out. He never hops unless he has to reverse. He throws his toys in the air and pogos on his rear leg wtih great skill. The rehab vet said to build his core and we have accomplished that much and so much more. Most people meet him numerous times before noticing that he only has 3 legs. He has NO idea as far as I can tell that he is different. After reading this, I feel like I have done something wrong.

    Reply
    • Hi Zeus and family! First, you are doing everything right by meeting with a rehab therapist! That is more than most people do when they don’t know about what a Tripawd needs, so give yourself a pat on the back. What you are describing sounds pretty typical for a young dog. Our German Shepherd (also a rear leg) was also super energetic like your boy when he was young. Yes, things will catch up with him and he will slow down but as long as you continue checking in with the therapist and being diligent about his fitness and exercises, he should do just fine. Please come over to our Hopping Around Discussion Forum to share more about him OK? Thanks for sharing.

      Reply
  57. I would love a copy of this article for the rescue where I adopted Shu from. Is it possible to get one to provide for them? It’s terrific and thanking goodness I found you on my own!

    Reply
    • Oh good to know! Are you having to change it? I’m so glad he’s happier, poor guy’s been through so much (and you as well). Keep up the healing!

      Reply
  58. Hi everyone! My tripawed cat is doing great ( aptutation in December) but he can NOT aim in the litter box. There is pee everywhere! Any advice? We have a covered box and an uncovered box.

    Reply
  59. Hiya my 1 year 7 month old Cockapoo, Female decided to prance around and took a fall off the sofa and we had to amputate her back left leg (14th Feb 2020) her recovery was fast and I’m so happy with the results.. However, for the past couple of days I’ve been checking her but I had to put her cone back on as she’s has a very small, reddish lump on her stomp. Its soft but it hasn’t affected her in any way.. She’s just been herself, jumping around, eating, drinking, playing etc etc.. I hope its nothing to worry about but I have now started to put the cone on so that she doesn’t irritate it but it does look like it’s getting better.

    I hope there’s someone out there who is going through the same as I really don’t know what it is or how she got it.

    Reply
  60. I have a Belgian malinois that has a deformed left leg they said I would have to amputate I’m a single mother of three is there any help out there that I could look for

    Reply
  61. My 5year old Rottweiler berry had Carcinoma in her rear leg and we had to amputate her leg in November! But from February the amputated part has become really hard as a stone and there is a swelling in the part ! She has lost her old charm and is having troubles walking or standing up and tends to drag while she has to get up ! Please help !!

    Reply
  62. Very helpful info. My pit one and half year old is 8 days out. She is very tired sits and stares not interested in toys, bones that she loved. But seems this can be normal for some. I pray she gets back to her spunky self after staples are removed in a few days.

    Reply
    • Jackie please pop into our Discussion Forums so we can help you better. Yes, only eight days out is not a long time but if her pain isn’t well managed from the beginning, this kind of behavior can occur. Glad she made it through surgery but please keep us posted on how she’s doing OK?

      Reply
    • My rescue pup was between 1 and 1.5 yrs old when he was hit by a car. Former owner sent him out to streets to die. He was 38 pounds (now 75!) and ravaged with worms and failing organs. Had back right leg amputated. I’m sure by now your dog has rounded the corner..it will happen. I remember being concerned my pup wouldn’t live a normal life but he is a mad man in the woods and the most appreciative dog I’ve ever met. I found when petting the “nub” pet over it and down towards where toes would be it seemed to help my guy with phantom leg issues. Keep your dogs weight in check and they’ll lead a happy life. We’re going on 5 years now. Good luck!

      Reply
      • Ryan thank you for sharing such great feedback! Your dog is soooo lucky to have found his way to you. Thanks for giving him a great life. Please feel free to submit your story for a Tripawd Tuesday feature, we would love to share it with the entire community!

    • Hi Jackie
      How is your fur girlie now.
      I notice you put a comment on that she was not interested in toys treats etc.
      Our Lurcher had his amputation 3 days ago. Prior to that we had a month of post surgery issues from a fracture op that didn’t go well. Our dog has been exactly as you describe – no interest in anything for over a month now.
      How long was it before your girlie returned to her original bright self please?.

      Reply
  63. YAY TriPod, YOU ROCK !! WE ARE GETTING A THRID TRIPOD IN OUR FAMILY, THE OTHER TWO HAVE SADLY PASSED AWAY, THEY WERE ALSO BOTH PET THERAPY DOGS AND ALSO R.E. A.D. DOGS *KIDS PRACTICED THEIR READING (TO THE DOGS) AT THE LIBRARY. WITH OUR NEW, VERY YOUNG, 9 MOS OLD, TRIPOD, UNNAMED AS OF YET, WE HOPE TO FOLLOW IN HER SISTERS PAWSTEPS. THANKS FOR SHARING YOUR STORY AND LOVELY MEMORIES.

    TO-BE-NAMED TRIPOD (HOPSCOTCH, BUT WE PLAN ON CHANGING THAT TO A PRETTY GIRLY NAME) AND SOON-TO-BE-IN-HER-NEW-HOME !!
    ~CHRISTINE. (sorry for all the caps….didn’t notice when I was typing, but we certainly do mean YOU ROCK, TRIPOD !!

    Reply
  64. Reading about Wyatt is helpful for me as I have 10 1/2 year old Bonz a English Lab who is 2 years into his amputation of a rear leg. Bonz has always been active, hiking and swimming with our other dogs. Recently, I have noticed that he tires more easily on our regular 2 1/2 mile walks and sometimes will have problems getting up stairs for bed. Even without the amputation, I remind myself that he is aging. To make things easier I have reduced the days when we go the full 2 1/2 miles to half routes of shorter but different lengths. During the winter when we don’t worry about snakes, we tend to take walks in the back country. During the summer, we walk on a paved trail. I have begun to consider purchasing a stroller that would accommodate his 75# although I’m not sure he would agree to use it! We use a very simple sling to help Bonz getting up stairs when he seems to need it. I have also added a Twister Step to the back of my SUV to assist him getting into the car along with the sling. He gets that these things are designed to help him and will wait for me to wrap the sling around his waist before trying to step into the car.

    Reply
  65. My Cooper (front leg amputee at 7 months old) turns 9 years old this coming November!
    Hard to believe. All of a sudden they are seniors. We already pamper him and try to make him slow down in terms of playing fetch (his favorite). He’s still able to leap into the car like a kangaroo, using those powerful, muscular hind legs. He is an amazing creature.

    Reply
  66. Thanks guys, Awesome advise.
    Aksel_Rose has always needed extra grip for smooth floors. She likes her grippy boots.
    She will wear one on her remaining hind leg almost everywhere we go outside of the house. At home I am the master of the carpet runners. They are everywhere!!
    Although Aksel is only 4.5 y.o. we always need to think ahead and be prepared..
    Our fur-kids are everything!!!

    Reply
  67. Hi Jerry,
    Thank you so much for your great tips. My tripawd girl is only 2 and I hope that she will be pain free as long as possible. I do what you have suggested already. I learned canine massage, we do short walks, mostly 30 – 45 min. , a lot of swimming, joint supplements and a balanced raw diet. I am studying vet nursing now and also have a physiotherapist and two great vets at hand. When she gets older I will buy a dog stroller. Wheelchair won’t work for a front limb amputee. I love her so much and will do everything I can to make life easier for her.

    Thank you for managing this group. It’s full of good information and great support.

    Warm regards and pats ,

    Andrea & Tilly (doggy)

    Reply
  68. Thanks for sharing this. I look forward to Part II. With TriPod turning 9 in January he is definitely a senior dog now. So hard to believe…. I’m sure it was just yesterday that he was a puppy. Thank you for all you do. I am now looking into getting him some front “wheels” to take some stress off that front leg. Any thoughts on a good place to look?

    Reply
  69. Wow, thanks for the incredible story Jerry. I feel your spirit with me! Thanks for telling us what is most important in our lives. Sometimes as humans we forget the simple facts of life! What a beautiful story!
    Sunny’s mom
    Nesamoney

    Reply
  70. My greyhound got diagnosed with osteosarcoma on January 13th 2020 in the hind limb. The entire week went by so quickly. We did a met check the following day and all was clear, no sign of mets to the lungs or elsewhere. We drew labs and they were incredible. We scheduled his hind limb amputation for that Friday January 17th 2020. All was moving quickly and in the right direction. We consulted with many vets and amputation was the best option as the limb had visible bone swelling and a micro fracture already. My boy wasn’t suffering, he was a retired racer and quite stoic and I had him on gaba and rimadyl for pain. He had survived a lot, including a rattlesnake bite in the past and a heart attack from the venom. It’s heartbreaking to receive this sort of diagnosis with your beloved animal. We brought my boy in for his surgery Friday the 17th and all seemed well. He was stable throughout the procedure, vitals, potassium, everything. I went over everything with his surgeon prior to the procedure. I informed her of his cardiac issues (mitral valve regurgitation, heart murmur, past MI, etc). Apparently everything looked fantastic that morning, ECG, EKG, etc. I got a call that he was waking up from surgery and all had gone well. 5 minutes later I got a call that my boy had endured a massive heart attack and was deceased. Resuscitation efforts, atropine, etc, had failed. It is VERY difficult to make sense of a situation like this. I never once blamed anyone, I work in hospice and healthcare myself, things can go wrong. I just still am wondering what transpired with him. They knew and understood greyhound protocols and abided by them for his surgery. Everything was done right and he was completely stable prior and during surgery. I am not a vet and I’m curious if any vets read this what their perspective is. My boy didn’t have DCM, nothing like that. Osteosarcoma with a stage 2 diagnosis. Underlying cardiovascular issues sure, mitral valve regurg and a grade 2 murmur. I still wonder what happened. Everyone attending said he was coming out of surgery and his respiratory rate increased then his heart just stopped entirely. It’s very sad to lose your pet this way and I can’t seem to find any similar stories anywhere. Vets I know said he must have thrown a clot or had a heart defect that we weren’t aware of and couldn’t have been aware of. I don’t mean to scare anyone into not amputating, I just share my boys story to bring awareness that stuff can go south even when you were on the right path all along. You just never know. Cherish your pets. My boy was just shy of his 8th birthday. He was my therapy dog.

    Reply
      • Thank you so much. I just wanted to share his story. He had a quick diagnosis that was so acute and out of nowhere and a death that was so sudden as well. The tragic part or the most saddening part is that my birthday was on the 11th and we had hiked 5 plus miles in snow. I had no idea he had cancer. Fast forward to two days later and he was diagnosed then dead by the 17th. It’s amazing what our pets will endure and how well they hide their suffering. Initially the attending vet on the 13th chalked it all up to a soft tissue injury but after radiology looked they determined it was osteosarcoma.

  71. This is so interesting. Our Nico is 12 yrs old Boxer and had his rear leg amp 8 days ago. His rear leg does buckle at times like Wyatt’s, especially on our slick hardwood floors. Thanks for the wheelchair idea, it may come in handy. Best wishes of health to Wyatt.

    Reply
  72. Wyatt really hit the jackpot with his pawrents. I love the attention that you pay to his needs on the active, and not so active days. Thanks so much for sharing. He really does well as a GSD tripawd. Mitch had 4 legs and did not get around nearly as well. All that hard work has really helped him as he goes through his golden years.
    Lots of hugs and love to you all!
    Jackie and Huck

    Reply
  73. My Benny had leg amputated today due to i osteosarcoma. Brought him home around 5. He has slept most of the time. He has been whimpering for the past hour or more. Is that normal? I did get him to take his pills with some meat. Thank goodness! Any suggestions for post surgery care would be appreciated so much!

    Reply
    • Best wishes for Benny! That type of behavior sounds perfectly normal for a dog that came home from amputation surgery the same day. He will still be coming down of the anesthesia medication for a while, and needs nothing but confinement and rest right now. Make sure you stay on top of the pain management, consult your vet with any serious concerns, and find many other posts about what to expect here in the Tripawds News blog. Or, start here for help finding the many other resources and assistance programs.

      Reply
  74. I was lucky with my 3 cats when I brought Sky home. Actually he didn’t smell like the hospital as my wonderful vet kept him at her home for the first 2 nights. I have a very large carpeted closet – actually was called a bedroom technically – that I set up and it was quiet and warm for Sky. I put a gate across the door so the other 2 could sniff him. No hissing or any bad behavior. When I eventually let them get together, my least social rescue cat began grooming Sky. That was well over a year ago. He still grooms him to this day. <3 . So we had no issues thankfully with the other cats. It was hard enough as it was!

    Reply
  75. So wrong. The vet school at Texas A&M is not cheaper, in fact, it is higher. They also do more tests, thereby raising the cost even more. The care is excellent, but be prepared for a large bill.

    Reply
    • Hi Marian. Well, the article was written in 2014 so costs have gone up everywhere accordingly. As for diagnostics, in our experience the amount of workup really depends on the condition the vets are trying to diagnose. Either way, yes, we can definitely agree that the Aggies are fabulous!

      Reply
  76. My greyhound has Osteosarcoma in the humerus of her right front leg. do we need to have her leg amputated before undergoing this treatment? There is no evidence of metastasis so far and we’ve gone through two rounds of palliative radiation recently. We live in San Diego county and would like to know if a clinical trial is available in our area as well as the participation cost. Thank you for your help!

    Reply
    • Hi George, for the latest criteria we suggest contacting Aratana at 1-844-ARATANA (272-8262). They can help you find a local clinic participating in the trial (and I do believe you have one in San Diego). Please join us in our Discussion Forums so we can help you and your pup. Best wishes to you both.

      Reply
  77. Thank you for this <3
    Murphy made it well past that 23 months – he lived over 4 years past his amputation. So proud of how well that boy did.
    Donna

    Reply
  78. Thank you for sharing Tana’s story, it gives us such hope! We have adopted a GS tripaw under similar circumstances. His front left leg was amputated at 16 weeks of age due to an attack by another dog. The owner at the time was going to have him put down but at the vets urging surrendered him to a rescue. Louie is now 8 months and teaching us what a survivor he is. He trust us, is growing happily while his PTSD is getting fewer and far between surfacing.
    We are hoping that he will one day figure out how to maneuver stairs like your Tana did.
    Louie can now get himself on and off the couch…. what a wonderful day it will be if and when he can get himself in and out of the car 🙂
    C

    Reply
  79. Hi our. Chocolate lab, Allie had bone cancer and had to have her front leg amputated on 12/19 The first 9 days were terrible, she did not eat for 9 days or want to get up. At one point she went over 30 hours without urinating. On the 9th day you can imagine how happy we were to find her standing and walking. Then she started to eat. 3 weeks into recovery we were feeling good then vet said she had dead skin in the area of the surgical site. We were relieved to learn it was not cancer, but once the stitches were removed we found this gapping hole. That is why the skin died, it did not connect to tissue under it. We’ve been nursing the whole for 12 days, it seems to be healing. Our last vet visit our vet said there was area the size of a pencil that is several inches deep with a hole. Is this normal? Is this bad veterinary work? Why is this not stitched closed? Really does seem like there is any thing to stitch to. So far it’s healing. The bummer is she can’t take chemo until healed and she is on pain medication and she is held back from being herself on pain medicine. Anyone ever heard of this? Thanks for any insights.

    Reply
    • Hi Allie and family, welcome. We’re so glad she is on the mend! Fear not, others have gone through similar wound issues after amputation surgery. No, it’s not necessarily bad surgical work, it’s just something that occasionally happens. Sounds like your vet is confident it’s healing, that’s great! Please come to our Discussion Forums where we can help and support you on your journey OK? Hope to see you there.

      Reply
  80. Hello, I am writing for some advice about my 13 year old jack russell Sonny. In the summer of 19 he developed a mass cell tumour. The tumour was removed however it has came back with vengeance. Our only option now us amputation, however he is of an age and has a heart murmur. Is this a massive risk. We and the vets think he could pull through and live another happy year or so. I just want other peoples perspectives? Thanks, Alice.

    Reply
    • Alice, I’m sorry to hear about Sonny. To get other perspectives, please post in our Discussion Forums “Size and Age Matters.” My own perspective is that if you get at least two or three opinions from veterinarians, you can make a more confident decision. For a small dog, 13 isn’t that old and Sonny could go on to have at least a few more years of quality time. Good luck and please go to the Forums where the entire community can help you better OK?

      Reply
    • My 18 year old MC cat just had amputation surgery due to a tumor that grew out of control. He also has a congenital heart murmur. His surgery was 06/30/2020. The big concern due to his age & murmur was him surviving anesthesia.
      He did just fine in the surgery and was using the litter box on day 2. It all depends on the animal. We always knew Captain was a strong lively guy and we had a lot of hope he’d be ok. We did try to emotionally prepare that he might not make it, but his quality of life/pain from the tumor was bad enough that it was the only choice left for him. You know your boy, and you know what’s right for you. I’m here if you need to talk.

      Reply
      • Hi. My 15 year old cat had a front leg amputated yesterday due to cancer. He cannot move at the moment and just pretty much sits on the floor. He hasn’t drunk anything yet but has eaten. I’m very anxious about his recovery and fear he’ll never learn to walk again.
        Can anyone reassure me that his is normal?
        Thank you so much
        Natasha

      • Natasha, it’s good that your cat ate something but please contact your vet about your cat’s behavior. Don’t wait. Your cat needs to stay hydrated or it could lead to serious problems. Is this behavior normal? Yes and no, all cats are different, but what you are describing sounds as if your cat needs his pain management adjusted, or may have something else going on that your vet needs to know about. Also, come to our Discussion Forums for more insight from the community. Best wishes to both of you.

  81. Hello your story gives me hope. My 11 year old Siberian who thinks he is 6 just had this procedure done yesterday. We originally thought the tumor was not connected to bone via xrays. However when they went in to remove it they had to take 6 cm off near the very back side of the scapula from shoulder joint but still involved a good amount of muscles connections. Did you use any shoulder braces during recovery to help Liam to run again ? We are hopeful for full recovery for our pup And looking for things that worked. 🙂 Thank you

    Reply
    • Hi Wendy-
      Liam had a shoulder wrap right after surgery, but that was more of a bandage than a brace. We followed our vet’s recommendations, and he never had any further issues from his shoulder. Liam passed away when he was 16 as a happy old guy, and his spirit still runs the snowy trails of my mind. Good luck with your Sibe – I am sure he will be up to his old ways soon.

      Reply
  82. Tripawds Spokesdog Cadence is now and 8.5 year survivor. Her 9 year anniversary is July 29th! There was no vaccine available during Cadence’s diagnosis and recovery. Glad that is an option to help dogs live longer lives!

    Reply
    • Oh my dog Heather! I can’t believe it’s been that long, I totally spaced on Rock Star Cadence’s longevity! WOWWW! Please send us a blog post with some photos and we will feature her in our Tripawd Tuesday blog post. The more long-term survivors we can share with the community, the better! CONGRATS!

      Reply
  83. Way to go Dexter and family! What a truly uplifting story. Dexter has beaten the odds and gives hope and inspiration to new tripawds and their families looking for support in their journey to beat this despicable disease. Happy birthday Dexter!

    Jackie and Huckleberry

    Reply
  84. We are sitting in the surgeons office hoping he can do the scapulaectomy for our 7 yr old golden with osteo sarcoma…your article and video gave us a LOT if hope for the outcome!

    Reply
  85. EXCITING!!! A lot to talk about indeed!
    Loved seeing thus little video clip. Made me smile
    Hope those facebooger people join our forums….just sayin’

    Reply
    • Well Sally, great minds think alike, because that’s exactly our intention: to let the Facebooger folks know how much MORE pawesome life is over at Tripawds.com! Stay tuned.

      Reply
  86. My 3 year old Rottweiler had bilateral cruciate surgery in January 2019 as poor genetics gave her bad knees. The surgery and recovery went well. However 6 months later she just stopped using her right hind leg. The surgeon who preformed the surgery told us that her knee was “end stage” and it is what it is. I contacted Cornell University Companion Hospital for a consult. To my surprise, yes the right knee needs a complete replacement but it is the left rear knee that needs TPLO surgery as the original surgery failed and the femur slipped behind the tibia. Worst they’ve ever seen. Now I my girl is faced with surgery and a recovery that leave her with no rear limb for a time. Any words of advice?

    Reply
  87. Hello… I’m new here. My sweet Buddy was diagnosed with osteosarcoma couple days ago. I’m so heartbroken, confused and the sadness has taken over. Buddy is our family, he is the most incredible dog, so loyal and loving. Buddy is 12 years old and until now, he was in good health. I don’t know what to do. Can a 12 year old dog thrive after amputation?

    Reply
    • Hi Dedee and Buddy, welcome. We are so sorry about the diagnosis, and can totally relate to your situation. Please come to our Discussion Forums and post in our “Size and Age Matters” topic, where you will find that yes, twelve year old dogs can do well on three as long as they are otherwise healthy. Please hop on over OK? We are waiting to help you there.

      Reply
  88. My 13 year old feline has small cell lymphoma. The vet is ordering chlorambucil and prednisone. I have to have the money to pay for it but it will be a hardship. Any ideas/comments/suggestions would be appreciated very much. Thank you.
    Lynne

    Reply
  89. Thanks so much for bringing this to our attention! Fascinating!
    Yeah, the length of time this study takes could be years. Of course, it’s sad that some of the placebo group would have to develop cancer in order to see if it is effective for those who had the actual treatment.

    It would also be interesting if all the dogs were on same nutr6 plan, same supplement plan, same number of limited rabies vaccines, same general age of spying/neutering (or left “intact”), etc. That said, most of that is probably addressed in some form or another in the paperwork and follow up.

    To think this might work would be the miracle we all want!!
    With appreciation
    Sally and Alumni Happy Hannah and Merry Myrtle and Frankie too!

    Reply
    • I agree Sally! What IF we could have them all on the same diet and protocols? Wow that would be crazy good, but unfortunately that’s probably not realistic. Still, the vaccine study is as close as we’ve gotten to any kind of way to eradicate this disease and I’m totally confident the scientists will come up with something to do it. Stay tuned!

      Reply
  90. We love you guys soooo much and we are pawsibly the mostest grateful Tripawd (Thurston), Big brother (Raffie) and Hoomama in the whole world! Thanks to you guys I have somewhere at complain about Hoomama and she has someplace to brag about Meeeeee! Luff, Thurston

    Reply
  91. I will always be thankful I found this amazing place, with the most amazing people ever! I would not be the person I am today if not for the lifeline Tripawds threw me when I was drowning 5 years ago. I am truly blessed to have you in my life.

    Paula and Warrior Angel Nitro (and the Terrorist Trio)

    Reply
    • Paula, you bring a sense of calm and reassurance to members here like nopawdy else. You are so much stronger than you give yourself credit for, and we are furever grateful to call you our friend. Hugs coming at ya!

      Reply
  92. Lovelu sentiments snd sich grear ohotos. Always remember though, the ripple of waves of love and pawsitivty start with you two. And those ripples have no ending.

    Thank YOU
    With love
    Sally and Alumni Happy Hannah and Merry Myrtle and Frankie too!

    Reply
    • Sally, thank you. But honestly, we just put those waves out there. It’s amazing people like you who spread the magic among this community, over and over again. We love you my friend!

      Reply
  93. Yeah! I have my amazon smiles account set up to support Tripawds! Can anyone help with the boots? Do any of them work for dogs with dewclaws?

    Reply
  94. My dog was born with hemimelia in his right forelimb, he just turned 2 years old last week. When I adopted Chance he was only 6 months old and one of my concerns was the long-term affect it may take on the rest of his body. I’ve tried to research and learn how to best help him and prevent issues but there is not much information available about dogs that were born as a tripod. He has already had surgery for elbow dysplasia in his left leg and we are hoping a prosthetic will help take the load off of that leg.
    I would love to see a lifetime study done on Tripawds, there definitely needs to be more data available for professionals to use when giving advice and paw parents to learn from. By the way, we live in Colorado and would be very interested if CSU decides to move forward on this!

    Reply
  95. When my dog became a tripod I did a lot of research on the internet and didn’t find a lot about long term studies of three legged dogs. Just recently I thought about a tripod study and was hoping someone would start doing one. When older dogs become a tripod it is certainly different to a puppy. Mine was just 12 weeks old when she had her accident. She would have been a great study pup. Her body was still growing. Her leg got amputated in May this year (accident happened in February the year before). So far she’s doing very well on her three legs but she’s only 2. I am very concerned about arthritis later in life but I am working with a great vet and a physiotherapist to ensure as much prevention as possible. However, she’s a dog and loves to run…If there is ever a study coming up I am more than happy to contribute. The only problem is, we live in Australia.

    Reply
    • Hi Andrea,

      Thanks for sharing your dog’s experience. Your pup is so lucky to have you, what a great job you are doing to keep her strong and healthy.

      We have a lifetime study on our radar and now all we need is the $ to kick it off. We will keep everyone posted.

      P.S. Being in Australia isn’t a problem, it’s pawesome 🙂 We are jealous!

      Reply
  96. I loved this interview, thank you very much for sharing. I recently nominated my dog to participate in the Dog Aging Project study and I’m waiting to see if he was accepted. There definitely seems to be a lot of work that goes into these studies, but I really hope that they do a lifetime study on tripawds someday. There’s so much we could learn.

    Reply
    • You are so welcome! Thanks for listening and for enrolling your pup in the DAP project! We’ve heard great things about it. All of us will keep our paws & fingers crossed that your pup gets enrolled. Let us know when you hear back.

      Reply
  97. Hi Joel & Ross,
    Wondering if you might be willing to connect/chat with me as we are battling osteosarcoma with our 6.5 year old Dane, Winnie. She underwent CyberKnife in September at Vet Cancer Group in Culver City (LA). Doing really well but has two fractures so we are considering amputation or limb-sparing and trying to gather as much info and testimonials/real stories as we can. Would love to speak with you if you’re open to it. Our perfect girl is a rescue from Indian Dane in San Marcos

    Reply
  98. O you beautiful big boy! O you beautiful brave mom! How lucky you both are to have each other. Doctors have their place – diagnosis, treatment, meds, surgery – but unfortunately for us and for our animal companions, what is in short supply in the medical profession is HOPE. Hope is the glue that keeps us together in these hardest of times! I urge all families tosearch for doctors that offer you hope. Head right back out that door if they tell you “nothing can be done”. Congratulations, Caroline and Gabriel, you kept your hopeful hearts!

    Reply
  99. I have recently adopted a 3 legged cat. Peeing on the rug. Sometimes litter box. Have another inside cat. Does he need his own? Missing RF leg.

    Reply
  100. We are 9 days post-surgery. My annie is a Malinois. Pre surgery she had very high energy and high prey drive. She is on tramadol and seems to be doing okay with the pain as far as I know but has absolutely no energy. Difficult to get her up to go to the bathroom. Is not interested much an eating. And does not lift her head when we come into the room or wag her tail much. Not sure if that is too much to expect so soon. Either way this is extremely difficult to watch and I continue to second-guess myself with did I do the right thing? Please share any advice you may have and if this is normal? I know she is only 9 days post-op but her chemo is set to start next week and I’m concerned about putting her through even more trauma. She had cancer in her front left leg. Her incision looks great and is healing well. Any advice is appreciated.

    Reply
    • Most members see vast improvement in their pups once off the pain meds. Annie may surprise you before you know it…until then, confinement and moderated activity are a must for a speedy recovery! Consult your vet with serious concerns, and check out the many Tripawds News posts about what to expect during these early days. Post in the forums for much more feedback from others!

      Reply
  101. Matt Martin is a SAINT!! Another human Soul living in sync with his mission.
    A well thought out brilliant way to help our beloved animals.
    Thanks for bringing this to ur attention and a standing ovation to Matt Martin and CoFundMyPet And love the Chi modeling the teeshirt!

    Gratefully
    Sally and Alumni Happy Hannah and Merry Myrtle and Frankie too!

    Reply
    • Hey Sally, I have no idea how I missed your comment until now, but THANK YOU!!!

      We love what we do and hope to continue to grow the thousands of pet parents we’ve already helped in our first 6 months. We just don’t want to think about a few hundred dollars being the difference for an otherwise treatable pet not having more time with their family.

      Matt

      p.s. Carlos is still “learning to love” his CoFund My Pet t-shirt!

      Reply
  102. Just wanted to add, that some of the organizations listed do not currently have funds. After visting their site, they will have funds after more donations are received, so I did leave them on spreadsheet.

    Reply
  103. Thank you Jerry. But mostly all I did was take the information that was posted on this site and transfer to a spreadsheet, and I did find some additional ones along the way.

    Reply
  104. I’ve, just been so touched ( and soooo unxeserving!) by what Jim and Rene put together❤. And to see those photos of my sweet pups…an extra bonus.

    I consider it to be such an incredible privilege to be a part of this loving and supportive community. You all contribute in so many ways to reach out and help others…..such true selfless role models for us all❤

    Paula, thank YOU my dear friend fot being YOU!! Talk about compassionate…look in the nirror!! Always giving to all of us on so many levels!!❤

    Repairman. (aka master of lawnmower repairs on 20 yr old lawnmower and more!!) Thank you Mark! Very kind of you❤❤

    Rene

    Love to all
    Sally and Alumni Happy Hannah and Merry Myrtle and Frankie too!

    Reply
    • Oh my gosh Sally you TOTALLY deserve the praise. You are a DEAR to this community and do so much for others. We love you to pieces and are grateful to have you in the family.

      Reply
  105. Wow! Do a video next time!! People will fall in love with Sally and her animal world. She is such a blessing to call a friend. from: Sally’s repair man

    Reply
    • Aww thanks for listening! She IS great isn’t she? Would loooooove to do a video call with Sally but first we have to figure out that low-bandwidth Interwebs problem on her property. Got Internet? 😉

      Reply
  106. What a great interview! I love listening to Sally talk, she has so much insight and wisdom, and endless compassion. I’m honored to call Sally a friend and so blessed to have met her in person. Thank you for sharing her with everyone!

    Paula and Warrior Angel Nitro

    Reply
  107. I don’t know if anyone still monitors this site. Its October 2019. But I just wanted to say thanks. There is not a lot of information about wound aftercare for amputation.

    I had two dogs. A female GSD who recently passed in April due to complications from degenerative poly neuropathy, two failed surgeries, and an aggressive strain of MRS-P.

    Now our other GSD-mix was just diagnosed with osteosarcoma and in the same week we were told we had to amputate his rear right leg.

    It’s been pretty trying, but he’s been healing well. And we didn’t know what to expect after the awful experience we had with our first dog.

    I just wanted to add my little crumbs of info in case it helps anyone else: my dog is almost 80lbs and has osteoarthritis and a partial tear CCL in his remaining hood leg. The vets told is he was perfectly fine and still a candidate for his amputation. And he has been. 7 days post-OP and he hops around just fine. We would wake up in the mornings to him trembling or shivering, panting and drooling. Turns out it was about the time when his pain meds would wear off, once we gave them to him, 30min later he’s calm and happy again. He also came home from surgery with a droopy watery red lazy eye. But just some eye drops and a few days later he was fine. They often get dry eyes or dust or some small thing in their eyes during the hospital stay that can irritate.

    And the last thing I will add is the best thing I bought was a lambs wool sling that I could quickly throw around him when he stands to help him learn to walk again. Brought it to the hospital to bring him home with it and even the vets loved it.

    Reply
    • Thanks so much for sharing your experience Elizabeth, it is very helpful. I’m just sorry you had to go through that but glad your dog is doing well. Please consider joining our Discussion Forums where you will find a lot of great people ready to discuss life on three legs and learn from each other’s experiences. Hope to see you there!

      Reply
  108. Belle is such a beautiful Soul and has an truly inspiring story to tell!
    Team Belle stayed focused on solutions with a pawsitive oitcome snd brought about astounding results!

    Thanks for sharing the story of Belle and her devoted family and medical team. So uplifiting!
    Hugs
    Sally and Alumni Happy Hannah and Merry Myrtle and Frankie too!

    Reply
  109. I have 2 tripawd dogs, both rear leg amputees. One is 2 years, Shepherd mix small female 45 lb, the other lab mix 7 years 75lb.
    My lab mix is experiencing difficulty in walking, going up stairs, and getting up after sitting. I have tried rimadyl, and the “g” drug, neither seem to get much relief and make his mood strange. Have also tried glucosemine and recently CBC I his food.
    Seems like soreness in his back and groin, when I massage him
    Where to go from here. Laser?, massage? When I exercise him, he cannot get up but drags his rear….so I don’t
    He loves his life, too young to die, and I have another dog. Owing up and want her to have a long life
    As we face winter and colder weather it just gets much harder for him to move go upstairs and be active.

    Any suggestions you might have please let me know I live in Parker Colorado

    the other 7 years

    Reply
    • Please consult with a certified canine rehab therapist for proper evaluation, treatment recommendations and the best exercise program designed specifically for your pup. (Walks do not build strength, only stamina.) Visit a CCRT or CCRP and the Tripawds Foundation can even pay for your first visit!

      Reply
  110. Hi! Don’t forget Bandit’s BandAid! They help all dog breeds in emergency situations. I did a fundraiser for Charles’s one year ampuversary and we raised almost $250 for Bandit’s BandAid! Great folks over there!

    Reply
  111. I am so excited to get the book! Cannot wait to read it I already pre-ordered the Kindle version this morning as soon as I found out it was available.
    Congratulations Rene and Jim, this is such wonderful news, I know Jerry is smiling from above
    Happy Birthday Angel Jerry, thank you for sharing your most awesome pawrents with us. You have been the inspiration of a lifetime
    Many hugs and lots of love,
    Jackie and Huckleberry

    Reply
  112. We are facing something similar with our 5 year old dog Sadie. She started limping one day and several days later I literally thought he leg was broken from the way she was knuckling over. Her xrays came back fine, no break or fracture. We saw a neurologist who said she suspected a nerve sheath tumor. We were referred to the University of Georgia Veterinary Teaching Hospital for a complete neurological work up. Although her MRI “lit up” they were not able to differentiate between inflammation and a tumor. They did a nerve biopsy which was inconclusive as well and an infectious work up, which was negative . Sadie came home after a week at UGA on antibiotics, steroids and gabapentin for nerve pain. This all started at the beginning of August and had only progressed in spite of all our efforts. She is still unable to use her leg and it’s just wasting away. We return for our next visit at UGA Tuesday to determine our next step. They will repeat the MRI to see if the area that lit up has increased in size, if so they feel
    it is most likely cancer, if not, it’s a brachial plexus injury. They said she will never regain full function of her leg, if she even regains any function at all. We are devastated! Sadie was such a happy dog, full of life and now she seems sad, frustrated and depressed. She has basically been at Tripawd since this happened. Will her love of life return if her leg is amputated?

    Reply
    • We are so sorry to hear about Sadie. What a tough time for all of you! It’s very difficult having an uncertain diagnosis but rest assured you are working with a GREAT team that will help your girl get her sparkle back. Do keep in mind that what we humans perceive as “depression” in dogs is more likely a response to the pain they are in, and once the pain is gone, they are back to their old selves. We see it again and again. Please do visit our Discussion Forums to share her story and talk to other people for much more help. See you there!

      Reply
  113. Oh wow thank you Dawn! I thought I had checked them all. Yes if you would like to send me a list of the links and updates that would be GREAT! Email me when you have a chance.

    Reply
  114. This is wonderful, and so important but some links need to be checked for viability. The first in “Funds Pet Owners…” should be “Angels”, I believe, but I can’t locate a program there any longer. Banfield also leads to nowhere. We went through this list, or one similar 2 years ago and found some programs listed no longer existed, and came up otherwise empty because of income, disease, location or other restrictions. I am happy to click through links and provide updates as they are found.

    Reply
  115. A BLOCKBUSTER ON SO MANY LEVELS!! THIS IS SOOOO EXCITING!! CANNOT WAIT FOR THE RELEASE!!!
    And a blog site too?

    Jerry is indeed with you, with all of us! And without Jerry, there would be no “us”❤❤❤❤❤

    Gonna go get in line. And I hope you get this vlog post up in permanent form on the blog space and not rotate it out. Make sense?

    Love and light
    Sally and Alumni Happy Hannah and Merry Myrtle and Frankie too!

    Reply
    • You’re the best cheerleader Sally! Thank you for being so excited about it. Oh yes you’ll be hearing a lot more in the coming weeks and afterward. Stay tuned.

      Reply
  116. Hi, my dog was diagnosed with bone cancer 1 month ago she is on pain meds .. would like to know after amputation how much longer did your dog live ? and would you do it again?

    Reply
    • Jerry loved life on three legs for 2 years, without any IV chemotherapy. You will find many more stories from others in the blogs and forums where some dogs survived much longer. Every dog is different. For the best feedback from others please post in the forums or start here for help finding the many Tripawds resources!

      Reply
  117. I have a 9 month old female German shepherd with her left shoulder and leg amputated due to a birth defect. I’d very much like to have something fitted for her that could possibly work long-term she’s just a puppy & soon to be an adult. I want her to have a very functioning quality of life long-term. She is an amazing dog. Please help us. 🙂

    Reply
  118. My dog is on day 7 from surgery. She’s almost 10 it is the front leg. She’s a healthy whippet that had the removal due to cancer . She is still very lethargic, seems depressed, only will walk to relive herself. She son gabapentin, medacam, and Tylenol 3. She is now done the gabapentin as of tonight, but still seems painful.
    Is this common
    Thx

    Reply
    • There are many ways to identify and treat pain symptoms many people overlook. Being only about halfway through the recovery process, what you describe for your pup does sound pretty common. Confinement and moderated activity are pertinent now. She should only be having short leashed potty time right now anyway, until completely healed. Please consult your vet with serious concerns and start here for help finding the many Tripawds resources.

      Reply
  119. Nina,
    I have no other way to get in touch with you apparently so I am hoping you come back here occasionally and find this.
    I have wanted to thank you for your very kind words in my blog. I am no better today -going on two years- but your words made me feel like we’re two peas in a pod. Thank you so much for your kindness and for sharing. I will remember you and Connor forever.
    Biggest hugs
    Tina
    without Manni

    Reply
  120. Hi, my cat had his front leg amputated 2 years ago and now i’m noticing that the bone where his leg used to be is ‘more present’, in the sense that when I pick him up i’m feeling it more than I used to. I don’t know whether it’s just my imagination or maybe he lost a bit of weight (although he doesn’t seem like he lost weight as he’s quite chubby).

    Has anyone ever had this problem?

    Thanks

    Reply
  121. Nocita was extremely helpful. Those 72 hours of pain relief Moose got was very helpful to get him home and settled and for us to adjust to our new reality. Knowing it only lasted 72 hours also gave us the opportunity to evaluate changes when he did start having pain.

    Reply
    • I’m so happy to hear that it helped. And yeah that is a good point about knowing exactly how long it will last. Great job! We hope Moose is doing well.

      Reply
  122. Whoo Hooo Dr. Downing! I LOVE HER! Only wearing three legs or 2 legs;)
    Yes, they adapt and are happy to move along differently.
    Wow, we need more Dr. Downings in this world.

    I look furward to reading more!

    Reply
  123. Jerry, what is the best way to get in contact with Dr. Kramer? I want to ask her about borrowing (front) wheels for my Sophie post-op. She’ll only need them for a few weeks until her shoulder heals.

    Reply
  124. How is it I’m just now seeing this? One would think I’d been busy trying to build a house or keep a dog from eating the neighbors. So, so lovely to see everyone and of course I was crying and grinning throughout.
    Highly recommend IRL gatherings!
    Hugs!
    Teri

    Reply
  125. Karen was amazing helping the whole family through an extremely traumatic time. All the way over here in Australia we found a truly wonderful, caring person.

    Reply
  126. A wonderful well deserved way to pay tribute to an INVALUABLE , LOYAL, COMPASSIONATE, KNOWLEDGEABLE long term member! She’s always in the front line willing to help others. I know I’ve been the recipient of her generosity of spirit many times, starting with my Hapoy Hannah, and carrying on through Frankie and Merry Myrtle..

    I refer to Stubborn Pug Maggie too many times to count when I want to offer inspiration and hope. to others. I always encourage mothers to read about her journey. For one thing, you will always get a chuckle as you get to know Pug Maggie and all the ways she earned the name “stubborn”. Reading about Rani and Obie, and of course Elly…….enlightens is on so many levels!!

    I haven’t had a chance to listen to the Radio Podcast yet ( it sure if tablets can do that), but Ioooooved watching Elly do her nosework! She nailed it! I love how she kept double checking and kept showing Karen where the prize was

    Thank you Pug Magfie, for bringing us Karen. So much about what is good about this site is because Karen is such a major component of it

    Love and light❤
    Sally and Alumni Happy Hannah and Merry Myrtle and Frankie too!

    Reply
  127. What a great interview! Loved hearing the questions and the answers Karen gave. Was also good to put a “voice” to the name. Can’t wait for more episodes of this

    Reply
  128. Out kitten, Harry, is about 9 weeks old and was born with a “dead” right-rear paw. His leg was partially amputated but the “stub” is bleeding (lots of spots on bed ,blankets, etc.).
    We need to find the best vet in Orlando area, right away, to examine our kitty & maybe do more surgery.

    Reply
  129. My dog is just hours post op. They have given me gabapentin, carprofen, buprenorphine, tramadol, and cephalexan. Sorry if the spelling is wrong. It’s midnight and I’m exhausted. I’m a relative of the vet and I feel like they’re doing everything possible to keep her comfortable, 110lb Rotti, but I kind of feel it’s overkill. Thoughts?

    Reply
    • Hi Bridget. Sorry for the diagnosis. No, this is not overkill and it sounds like your vet is giving some good pain management. Try to put yourself in your dog’s paws: amputation is a major surgery that needs major pain management for at least 10 days or so. Work with your vet if you feel it is not enough or too much and join us in the Forums for faster help from the community.

      Reply
      • I’ve created an account! So happy to have found such a supportive community. Roxy is 9, 110lb Rottweiler, that was diagnosed with osteosarcoma in her front right leg. Yesterday, was her amputation. She’s been kept pretty comfortable with the arsenal of meds. My next question is when does she go to the bathroom? How do I help her? It’s very overwhelming and I feel pretty helpless.

  130. My Teddy a Male Dog never had any symptoms of cancer but a lump not a reddish one never had any pain when he move around after taking a x Ray Doctor said he suspect it as a bone cancer and to amputate which I did and the samples send for a histopathology Of bone tissue. My dog 100% healthy even now a Crocker spanioal 5 years old.

    Do you think this is a Bone Cancer.

    Reply
  131. Awww everyone, I’m thrilled you enjoyed the video and hope we captured the essence of your magical sisterhood. Thank you so much for doing the video for the community!

    Reply
  132. It’s so hard to put into one short video what Tripawds has done for us! Yes we met in the forums and the chat room first, then a few of us met in Chicago at PuppyUp. Then even more at the Epic Pawty in Virginia. Our friendship has just grown and grown and grown. We’ve been there for each other through the hard times and through the good times too. And each year we get together and we reminisce about our babies – it’s so good to have people we can talk to about them, those that remember our journey with us, and we can feel with, we can let the tears fall without being embarrassed, because they remember too, and they loved them too. It truly is like having a bunch of sisters!

    Reply
    • And we spend a great deal of our time together talking about our Tripawd Hero’s – hours and hours worth. And we never get tired of listening to each other about different aspects of the journey. You’d think after 3 years of vacations together we’d run out of things to say about them, but we don’t. This keeps our heart dogs alive for us…I can’t put into words how important this is. Their lives mattered, the horrible journey was not for nothing – it all happened for a reason. WE FOUND EACH OTHER, WE FOUND FAMILY!

      Paula and Warrior Angel Nitro

      Reply
  133. That is just PAWSOME!!!!! I smiled throughout that whole video.. even though I only know a few of you.. I certainly feel the awsesome friendship you have developed together!!!

    Christine.. with Franklin and Maggie in hed heart!!

    Reply
  134. My tears are flowing right with you Michelle! Lump in my throat, warm fuzzies, tears, reconnected with our sister and great times through your “preeentation”…………GREAT JOB RENE!!! AO WELL DONE!!!

    The thought you gave to incorporating the ohotos pf our Spirit Dogs was just beautiful! Every photo was PERFECT!!! Yes, they are the heroes that brought us all together. They were all gifts on loan to us for too short a time, yet they are the gifts that keep on giving and always live in through us, and through our friendships.❤❤❤

    And the first hero of all, Jerry!!! He was…and continues to be….an eternal gift to all of us (with a little help from his hoomans and Wyatt)

    Thank you Soul Sisters, thank you Spirit Angel Dogs, thank Jerry…..and the pawty continues on!!
    BTW…all it takes is two for a pawty! Numbers don’t matter. Bonding with someone who “understands” the depth of love we have for our animals is the prize

    With love and appreciation to all
    Sally and Alumni Happy Hannah and Merry Myrtle and Frankie too!

    Reply
    • You are right it doesn’t matter the numbers. Just a meet up with one other person and it can grow from there.

      xoxoxo

      Reply
  135. And, next year will be year 4 of us getting together – in Wisconsin this time! Can’t wait to see my “family” again!

    Paula and Warrior Angel Nitro

    P.S. good job Rene of editing all our craziness

    Reply
  136. Brings back so many memories of a fabulous vacation with my sisters! They truly did get me through one of the most difficult times in my life. Everyone should be so lucky to meet their soul mates! Come on tripawd people…..plan a party and meet yours!

    Paula and Warrior Angel Nitro

    Reply
  137. I love it. But not smiling crying (of course I am LOL). I miss my gals and family. This is the greatest family on earth. Everyone of these ladies I would trust with my heart and soul. We have been through some of the roughest times together. But we also have shared some of the greatest together as well. When I said family I truly mean it.

    The Tripawds party in VA (the greatest epic party) was the first real vacation I had in years way before Sassy got cancer. I met some of the greatest people. What you didn’t see was we were missing a few ( Clare, Alison, Amy and Glenn, Donna’s husband, was at the first party.)

    All of us ladies have a great time when we are together. We bonded, when we get together each year its like we just left off where we were before.

    xoxoxo
    Michelle & Angels Sassy & Bosch

    Reply
  138. Great job ladies!! I am just grinning from ear to ear here seeing all of you! Love the t -shirts
    Thank you Rene for putting that together, it is so special to see the bonds that are made here.
    Hugs to all of you, just made my morning
    Jackie and Huckleberry

    Reply
  139. First of all, thank you SO much for the website and all the effort going into it.

    I just arrived here today, after a canine cancer diagnosis, and amputation was suggested for our wonderful 10 year old border collie. I entered “tripod dogs” into Google — your landing page was the fourth hit. Another page on this site was the fifth hit. So something is right. By rights, pages from this site should have been #1 through 1000….

    Reply
  140. Yesterday my 8 yr old Ridgeback mix was diagnosed with osteosarcoma in her front leg and unfortunately it showed up on chest x-rays also. I am waiting on the biopsy results to be certain. The vet mentioned amputation but I can’t seem to find any information on dogs where the cancer has spread and whether amputation is even a possibility. I will talk to the vet in the next few days when the results are back but was wondering if anyone had any input.

    Reply
  141. Hi, I absolutely loved this story about beautiful Emerson. Being from Sydney, it is very reassuring.
    Our boy has recently been diagnosed with Osteosarcoma and we are devastated.
    My partner has never seen a three legged dog and very nervous about it. He hasn’t slept in days. I try and show him these inspiring stories but I think he needs to see it with his own eyes to believe how great dogs do adapt.
    Thank you so much

    Reply
    • Aww I’m so glad you read his story Leona. There are mannnnny more so please tell your partner to come on over and we will try to help him feel better about the decision. Best wishes to you and your boy.

      Reply
  142. Is there a prescription drug you would recommend that I inquire about in lieu of Tramadol? My dog just had an amputation yesterday and I am trying my best to be on top of the latest and greatest and most effective way to treat her pain.

    Reply
    • Hi Denise, keep in mind that when used as part of a multi-modal pain relief approach, it is believed that Tramadol is effective. When used alone, not so much according to the recent study. If your dog doesn’t tolerate Tramadol, you can always ask your vet about adding Amantadine into the mix, which addresses another pain pathway effectively when used with Gabapentin and a NSAID. Hope this helps.

      Reply
  143. Our amazing pup, Desmond (or Desi to most), is a year and a half old Golden Retriever. He was diagnosed with an osteosarcoma in his left front leg about a month ago. He had been limping since the middle of February, but the vet kept telling us it was just a shoulder strain, until we finally pushed for an x_ray. After a very painful bone biopsy & having to watch our poor boy suffer in immense pain for two weeks, we got the call. It was cancer. The decision was so easy. Taking his leg meant no more pain, so that is what we did. The vet’s office took x-rays and bloodwork one week before surgery & both were clear. Of course, we were told the osteosarcoma could have spread microscopically, but nothing could be seen by the naked eye. We are now five weeks post surgery & Desi is doing AWESOME! He had a few complications with the incision (the vet had to go back in to remove some necrotic tissue & there was some infection present), but as of today, our sweet, playful, & loving boy has been returned to us. He also started his chemo pill today, so we are going to see how that goes. The oncologist said that his osteosarcoma was caught very early & now we are starting with a clean slate. I pray every single day (sometimes more than that) that the lung mets hold off for as long as possible. I worry about every sound Desi makes when he is breathing. I just worry about everything. We are thinking of starting him on CBD oil as well to add in a holistic approach to the chemo pill. We have already put over $6,000 with the biopsy & the amputation surgery, so we are not able to do the full chemo regimen, so I think adding in CBD oil can only help. All this being said, we are enjoying every single moment with our fur baby, b/c we never know when the last one will come.

    Reply
    • Thanks for sharing Desi’s story. You are an amazing Tripawd parent! We wish you lots of great, hoppy time together on three. Let us know if we can help at all!

      Reply
  144. My 12 year old Terrier mix developed a huge lump on his shoulder, seemingly overnight. X-rays showed moth eaten bone, typical of bone cancers but consults with experts were inconclusive. Nevertheless, we started Butters on Zolendronate and after the second infusion the lump opened up and drained blood and who knows what else. Further x-rays seemed to suggest that bone was being rebuilt. The “wound” healed and it was almost like he had never had the lump. Unfortunately, Butters had to be put to sleep a few months later due to liver failure. I truly believe the bisphosphonate was a miracle treatment.

    Reply
    • Holly thank you sooo much for your feedback on this treatment. I’m sorry to hear about Butters’ getting his wings, but so glad that he had some quality time with you. What a great mom you were to him. xoxo

      Reply
  145. How do I apply? My sweet MJ had cancer 3 years ago. We had to amputate her leg to stop the cancer. She jumped off the table after surgery and immediately did just fine! She’s now 14 and in the last few days her other back leg is giving her serious pain and I can hear her help when her hips move. She is still eating and going potty and moving, just in pain. It breaks my heart! She’s a rescue and her 14 year old and 6 year old sister rescue come running when she winces! We need help!

    Reply
  146. OMG! To see this post was just amazing. Thinking of all you guys do for us Tripawds and how much we love you and spirit Jerry!
    Love from Thurston, Raffie and Hoomom, Gloria

    Reply
  147. What a beautiful story! Reminds me so much of our Rottie, Reggie. In 2017 he was 5 years 3 months old when diagnosed. Same thing, osteosarcoma in his back left leg. Such a hard decision isn’t it to amputate. But as I can see you also learned they get along just fine, the horrible pain is gone & they know how to live life to it’s fullest. We’ve learned so much from him as I’m sure you did with your beautiful Major. Thanks for sharing his story.

    Reply
  148. Is gabapentin the drug it works best with? And I have been giving it to my dog per vet’s instructions However she doesn’t seem to be in terrible pain should I cut back on it?

    Reply
    • According to veterinarians we have talked to, Gabapentin and Tramadol may work synergistically with one another. Before assuming your dog is not in pain, please review these pain signals in dogs and talk to your vet about how and when to reduce her medications. Keep us posted in the Forums.

      Reply
  149. I believe that Bisphosphonates are a very useful alternative however our oncologist back then stated that they only seem to work on tubular bones such as in the limbs. It would be interesting to know what Dr. Kelly thinks about that.
    Thanks
    tina

    Reply
  150. Whohoo..yay for more attention to this treatment.
    And thanks for mentioning my Neka..u guys made me smile ear to ear..I mean literally smile!!…I’m also open to any questions anyone has:)

    Reply
    • I am soooo glad you saw it Steph! If it wasn’t for you and beautiful Neka this treatment wouldn’t have been on our radar. Thanks to you, we finally got to dive into this topic and hopefully others will investigate it if their vets didn’t present it as a choice. You are such a great pet parent, advocate and friend to the Tripawds community. Thank you so much.

      Reply
  151. I’ve been please with Pets Best. I paid $1000 a year with a 10% copay and $200 yearly deductible. They don’t cover hyperbaric chamber or O-Zone therapy and I’m fine with that. Usually they wire payment into my checking account within five days of the claim. premium rises as pet ages at renewal

    Reply
    • Good to know Luke. Our premium with them doubled for Wyatt when he turned 9. I think that their rates also depend on the breed. Glad you are happy with them!

      Reply
    • For this one they are amputating to take the dog’s tumor in order to create the vaccine. I don’t believe they are turning to limb spare first.

      Reply
  152. I cannot tell you how wonderful it was to see Otis’ picture when I opened up the newsletter this morning! For those Tripawd parents going through this, I should also add that as Otis grew more stable, there were still times, generally on walks, when I used my leg to help him balance so that he could do what needed to be done. I was also very careful around trees – the mounding of mulch around trees can be difficult for a Tripawd male if you do not approach the tree from the right angle and let him lean against your leg if needed. (Yes, I know we should have found better trees, but it is hard to argue with a dog and a favorite tree).

    Reply
  153. What a beautiful gift from you al! This is one of the most informative cases I have seen. It was majorly impactful and I am so grateful Spree made such a contribution with her life. Every tripawd owner (and not the case here but also owners of unfit pets at unhealthy weights) should see what osteoarthritis does to these poor pups. I’ve never seen this …and all most owners see are the examples of healthy plastic bones in our vets offices. A big thank you to Spree and her mom. Such. Valuable. Knowledge. Xoxo. My heart is with you.

    Reply
  154. God Bless your heart Spree. Journey isn’t easy but we all need this inspiration. I too have a tripawd and she has been diagnosed with Hip Dyspepsia and arthritis.
    Therapy and diet are a must but along with that, the love of their humans is the best medicine of all…
    Thanks for sharing.
    Kathy and my GSD Aksel_Rose

    Reply
  155. I did’t even think about raised feeders , Rocky seems to have no trouble but I’m all for making things even easier for him. So glad I checked this recovery shopping list out and I’ll be purchasing those asap.

    Reply
    • Good job! Thanks for the feedback, so glad it helped. Yes, raised feeders are great for three and four legged dogs. Imagine trying to bend over and eat your food from a bowl on the ground, then do it with one leg. Rocky’s a lucky dawg to have you for a mama.

      Reply
  156. Great information. It doesn’t work for me either but must help someone. Unfortunately our pets can’t tell us how they are feeling. Thanks for this article.

    Reply
    • You are so welcome. And you’re right, it is such a test of our sensitivity to animals’ behavior when trying to decipher their pain. I hope you find a medication that does help you feel better.

      Reply
  157. Hi, does any one know of someone whose dog was diagnosed with melanoma in the mouth and used the beads? My 8yr old chihuahua has a tumor on the side of his mouth. I went to an oncologist who suggested a vaccine but it’s duper expensive and not a guarantee that he will be ok after. I spoke to another vet who suggested the beads, I’m just looking for feed back, i feel so lost and helpless.

    Reply
    • This post (and treatment) is rather old. You might consider looking into Electrochemotherapy…we have new video interviews and articles coming soon.

      Reply
  158. Thank you so much for posting part 1 and part 2. I’m currently sitting in my living room while our greyhound is in her crate next to me – I collected her 12 hours ago following a front limb amputation for osteosarcoma. It has been the most harrowing thing I think I’ve ever done, given how dopey she was, yet how much she wants to stand up and move aboit. However, we just got back inside after a successful 4am hobble outside (with a sling to assist) to toilet. I think I can see the light. Nice to know I’m not alone in this!

    Reply
    • Welcome to the club nopawdy ever wants to join, and best wishes for a speedy recovery! Start here for help finding the many Tripawds resources. As a Greyhound lover, you should especially enjoy the Be More Dog podcast from our keynote at the 2012 Greyhounds Rock canine cancer conference.

      Reply
  159. My dog has just been diagnosed with Osteosarcoma (back leg). The leg will be amputated the day after tomorrow and he will then begin chemotherapy. The vet will x-ray his chest first (I am so hoping it has not already made it’s way there). I’m so glad I have found this blog because now I know I’m not alone. What I can’t come to terms with are the statistics and the inevitably bad prognosis. My heart goes out to those who have lost their special babies to this hideous disease. I will take on board the “be more dog” mantra – thank you for this forum.

    Reply
  160. 3 weeks ago my 9 year old Rottie was diagnosed with bone cancer. I’m devastated. The vet said it has already spread throughout his body because of the weight loss. He has his good days and he has his not so good days. Whenever I touch him, he flinches. WHY? Is it painful for him when I touch him. Taking him to an oncologist tomorrow. I think I need an expert to tell me what his quality of life is at this moment. I don’t want him to suffer any longer, but I’m so depressed thinking about losing my boy. I have another furbaby… Max, he is a black lab. How is this going to affect him?

    Reply
    • I’m so sorry to hear this. We just learned that our 10 1/2 old English Mastiff has bone cacner – in her front leg. We are devastated and I’m just sick to my stomach trying to figure out what is the right path of treatment for her. Be strong for your furbaby. He is lucky to have you.

      Reply
      • What are you sorry to hear!? Jerry loved life on three legs for two years, without chemotherapy, and this was back in 2007! Besides, it’s all about quality of life now, not quantity. Please listen to our Be More Dog podcast, to learn how to follow your pup’s lead on this journey. And sshhhhhh…she does not know she has cancer!

    • Ida I’m going through the same! Vet is saying she has suspicious Bristol femur cancer in her June leg she has been limping. I’m so lost and confused. Taking her to oncologist on Monday I don’t want to lose my baby girl but I don’t want her to suffer.

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  161. Healthy Paws paid for everything they said they would from my girl’s xrays, bone scan, amputation with 7 day hospital stay, chemotherapy, the osteosarcoma vaccine, and, sadly, for euthanasia. I am very grateful for Healthy Paws and have enrolled my new dogs with them, too. They have been a godsend for my past dogs over the years, too. Ultimately, they paid out over $20,000 in claims over a 25 month period. They allowed me to give her a very happy and very healthy 25 months. Worth every cent of the monthly premium.

    Reply
    • Wow thank you for sharing your experience! You’re not the first person to say great things about Healthy Paws. I’m so hoppy it worked out for your pack!

      Reply
    • We use Healthy Paws for our Tripawd, too. They covered the cost of her amputation and now they are covering her chemo. I chose a $250 deductible and a 90% reimbursement.

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  162. Well to understate the problem this just sucks! We have made so many longtime friends because of tripawds.com and are so grateful to be part of this community. I try to post on FB links to the sight as much as possible. And always refer anyone who has a pet who is or will be becoming a TriPod. I will be ordering more brochure to give to vets office as well. I wish there was more we could do but we will continue to spread the word as much as possible.
    Thank you for everything you do! You guys see PAWsome!!

    Denna & TriPod
    “Living life to the fullest……one hop at a time”

    Reply
      • Oh gosh don’t you worry about spelling or typos Denna! Thank you for your supportive message and all that you do to help us spread the word. We WILL get through and over this temporary hurdle thanks to the love and concern from great members like you. 3-paws up to you and the pack!

  163. Isnt this immunotherapy supposed to be used on Limb spare where the leg can be saved And the vaccine is made from the removed tumor?

    Reply
  164. What is the signs of cancer spreading to the lungs. I did have Daisy who died of lung cancer. She started acting lethargic and coughing. That was 15 years ago. They said there was nothing that could be done.

    For now brownie’s chest xray came back clear, but was wondering if there are other signs to watch for?

    Reply
  165. I thought it was kind of quiet in here… sheesh! What a terrible thing to happen. You would think with all the hits that the site has gotten over time would bring it up in popularity. I know speed is the issue here, but there are plenty of other slow sites (Verizon for example) that have awfully slow sites but they don’t appear to get blackballed for it.
    I will continue to advocate for this wonderful group in any way that I can. I don’t Facebook but I do Instagram. I will make some posts advocating for the site as I have a lot of tripawds on my list 🙂
    Hugs,
    Jackie and Huck

    Reply
  166. I am saddened to hear about the issues that Google is giving this wonderful site. When I adopted Jake at my local animal shelter I knew absolutely nothing about caring for him as he was only two days out from his back left leg being amputated. I looked at many places to find information but kept coming back to Tripawds.com because the best information and dialogue was here. I will start beating the drum on FB as often as I can even though I’m rarely on FB anymore because of their policies. Jake is doing super well only one month out from his amputation and I feel comfortable having my new three legged critter in my life. This site, the blogs and forums have truly been a God send for both myself and Jake!! May my Lord and God continue to bless your gift to all of us three legged critter owners.

    Gloria and Jake

    Reply
    • Gloria it is good to hear from you, how wonderful that Jake is doing so well! Thanks for caring and helping us get the word out, it’s greatly appreciated. Keep us posted on how your sweet boy is doing!

      Reply
  167. Why don’t we build a really super duper speedy but bare bones website that’s really fast and pleases Google. Then we can refer or link to our wonderful website here that we have been using successfully for years! There HAS TO BE a way around this Google nonsense! As all Tripawds know, faster does NOT mean better! Thurston mantra!

    Reply
    • Because it is the content that matters. We need all of our amazing resources to rank higher for the keywords they contain…and we’re working hard to make that hapen. 🙂

      Reply
  168. Not sure if anyone is still following this thread but our Max is going on 9 and will have his hind right leg amputated next week. Chemo and than the new Vaccine. The Vet we’re going to is charging $1,800.00 per treatment. It’s a lot but it sounds like it will work and will be worth every penny.

    Reply
  169. This is really upsetting. It is unfortunate how the world has changed so much in this way. I had zero idea Google did this kind of thing and always figured the most relevant information came up when searching. I wish there was more I could do. You guys have been so helpful to me and I’d like to see you at the top of the world.

    Reply
    • Thanks you Shubeanie. Yeah there are things that go on behind the scenes that affect lots of websites’ visibility, it’s an ongoing struggle to stay visible. Thank you for the kindness and reading our post. Spreading the word is the best way to help, we greatly appreciate it.

      Reply
  170. Thank you so much for posting about our beloved rescued dog Uran! I am his foster Mom and can say only good words abut him! He has super sweet personality!Not a barking type, housetrained, obedient, loves to be petted, friendly to anyone even strangers.
    Sincerely,
    Dire Straits Paws Rescue Team

    Reply
  171. This sucks 🙁 I know you and Admin are working the best you can. I certainly hope the things your mentioned do not have to go away. They are important.

    hugs
    Michelle, Angels Sassy & Bosch.

    Reply
    • Paw shucks Michelle, you work hard around here too to help others, this team effort WILL get us where we need to be on the Google monster. Thanks for all you do. xoxo

      Reply
  172. Hi from Nassau, Bahamas! Found you through a Google search while looking for ideas about how to help our Bruno ‘walk’ outside for bathroom breaks. Just home from the vet where he had his front right leg removed up to the shoulder. Bone cancer we only found out about last week. Still woozy and resting on his little bed. Had an EUREKA! moment when I saw the canvas shopping bag because I knew I had one from a a 1970s South FL shopping mall secured somewhere. Found it in the car trunk with the other shopping bags and it’s cut apart and ready to use. Awesome idea, thank-you 🙂

    Reply
    • Aww Gina I’m glad we could help! Here’s to you and Bruno, we send all our love for a speedy recovery. Please keep us posted in our Forums, we would love to hear all about your boy.

      Reply
  173. Luke4275–why is it funny? My pup goes in tomorrow morning for his surgery and they said that’s likely what they’ll give him in addition to his carprofen and gabapentin that he’s already taking

    Reply
    • Hi Bekka, I think he is referencing how Tramadol has made news recently about how it wasn’t as effective at managing pain as vets thought it once was. However, this information is based on a study for dogs with osteoarthritis, and they looked at Tramadol when given alone without other drugs. When it comes to amputation, so far vets are still prescribing it along with gabapentin and a NSAID (carprofen) because the drugs are supposed to work synergistically. If you have questions tomorrow be sure to ask your vet OK? And good luck! Let us know how things go, we are sending lots of pawsitivity your way!

      Reply
  174. Funny how tramadol is still listed as first choice of pain meds. I’ve never heard of the injection called nocita? Does anyone use this? I will investigate. Its sad when an amputated pet goes home with poor choice of pain meds

    Reply
    • We used nocita for my dogs amputation. I feel it did work well. They inject it as they are amputating. They use it inside the nerves themselves. It wears off about about 3 days.

      Reply
  175. Thank you for the interview as well. My oncologist was in agreement over a year ago that metronomic therapy didn’t do much. I know that when and if Simon gets lung mets, that I will look at radiation cyber knife or microwave ablation , and also consider high dose losartan with palladia. I wont consider surgery. .

    Reply
  176. Also heartbroken to read your reply. I remember I placed a call about this program and was told it cost $11,000. Of course my dog was not appropriate because he had no tumor to access. And I thought I read that linb spare was the goal of this. But doesn’t seem to be the case from the talk

    Reply
  177. My almost 11.5 year old Golden was born a tripawd and has proven that there is very little a tripawd can’t do. She participated in Obedience, Rally-O, Field, Tracking, Scenting, Agility, and also learned Flyball. She has had a breathing condition for over five years now and was just getting over a bout of pneumonia when bone cancer was discovered. It’s been 28 days since the ‘official’ discovery, but I had taken her in a few weeks earlier because she was lame in her hind leg … Our vets conclusion was it (the lameness) was to be expected because she was missing her front limb. This diagnosis didn’t sit well with me so I took her to a physiotherapist who gave use some exercises to work on … When she refused to even attempt to put weight on her back leg, I knew something else was wrong and made another veterinary appointment. It’s so frustrating that all the vets cared about was that they weren’t the ones to miss it. Because she is already missing a limb amputation isn’t seen as feasible and also the fact that the vet felt that it was an aggressive cancer based on the radiograph (although the lungs aren’t showing anything),. We were basically sent home with medication for 28 days and told that we would have to decide to let her go when the pain became too much. I’m sure like everyone else has experienced that initially being told you dog has cancer was a shock, but by the next morning we were researching figuring out how to beat this. The last few days have been the roughest … which is why I landed on this page … I have found so much information on how awful Bone Cancer is and all the statistics, but it’s difficult to find much on signs to look for as your best friend either beats the problem or progresses further. We have found the weather plays a huge role in pain levels, but recently there is fluid accumulating in her leg. The femur goes up and down in size … When it’s small we have hope the cancer cells are dying, but then there is a large mass again. It’s such a confusing thing to be working through with our girl. We hope to beat the ‘Big C’, but we also know there are many things going against us.

    Reply
    • Sarah I am so sorry to hear that about your pup. I would recommend meeting with an oncologist, there are other options such as radiation therapy that can alleviate the pain and maybe even reduce the tumor, as well as new immunotherapies that can be tried. I hope you find something for her soon. Please keep in touch in our Forums.

      Reply
  178. Alias Program
    My girl Sabrina (12 year old Rottie) was excepted in the trial program, we researched the program and it looked amazing. She had osteosarcoma on here rear leg. We signed up and schedule the amputation of her leg, very hard decision. The plan was to removed the leg and have the cell harvested then Elias would make the vacations and sent them back to my amazing vet IVO Phoenix. This was done and they contacted us to have the first one administered. We were very excited and later that day they again contacted us and said Elias contacted them and said that they did not have enough cells to create the 3 require vaccines. So we were no longer a part of the trial we were heart broken. The only reason we agreed to move forward with the amputation was to possibly extend her life by being in the program. My vet Dr Hershey being the amazing person she is was heart broken as well and offer the Chemo at no cost. There is nothing for sure in life I understand, my only comment regarding this is maybe they can improve the collection process in the future so that others will have the opportunity and success in their program. Alias program is so amazing and it provides owners to have their loved ones around longer, priceless! Great work keep advance technology!!

    Reply
    • Patrick, thank you for sharing your experience with us, it’s so important for others to know about every possible angle of participation in a clinical trial. I’m sorry things didn’t work out. Your vet is truly an angel on earth for helping your girl fight cancer.

      Reply
  179. That picture is so totally heartbreaking… and it is the grim reality of what happens when people are not responsible for their pets and treat them like second class citizens.
    I commend your attempt at responsible pawrenting… everybody that has ever chained a dog out should see what the outcome could be.. it could also be even worse.
    Having prior animal control experience I have seen everything from that to dogs getting themselves wrapped so tight around something that they could not breathe and nearly died.. to a little Scottie that was chained on to his owners deck and fell off the side while his owners were not home. These are things I will never be able to un-see.
    Wyatt, I am so glad your mom and dad found you!!!
    ((((((Hugs))))))
    Jackie and Huckleberry

    Reply
    • Jackie my heart aches for all that you went through in that role. You were an angel to those animals you tried to help.

      We have wanted to share this message for a long time now, just to let people know what can happen. I’m so glad you posted so that you can reinforce the message. Thank you for sharing your experience.

      Hugs & woofs back at ya from all of us but especially Wyatt!

      Reply
  180. My dog had a rear leg amputated 5.5 weeks ago. He has been on antibiotics since because he has bruising in the area still. After 4 weeks I noticed that the wound site was very firm. I asked the vet and they think that he might have a slight infection and that is why we still have him on antibiotics. In the last week I have noticed that the would site seems to be swelling more and it feels like there is fluid build up in the area. I found your site talking about seroma, is this something that only occurs right after surgery or is this something that can occur in my timeline of 4 or 5 weeks post surgery?

    Reply
    • Hi Tim. We have seen seromas develop a few weeks later, but since an infection is involved with your dog I would definitely have your vet take a look at it and culture the fluid to be sure the antibiotics are working. Good luck and keep us posted in the Forums!

      Reply
    • Hey, not sure if I am going to be able to comment or not, i got locked out from forgetting my password. My 3 and a half year old mastiff had his front left leg amputated due to osteosarcoma on wednesday, july 31st.

      The first three days were a breeze, but pretty much as the nocita (local anesthetic injection) wore off, he has been having a really hard time.

      He has been randomly screaming for minutes at a time. Top of the lung screams. I have read everything on her ei can find and we assume its phantom limb pain, but with his sutres still in it doesnt seem there is much we can do.

      It was so bad on sunday night (4 nights post amp) that we took him to the ER, of course when we got him there, he didnt scream at all. They gave him a methadone injulection and then a couple hours later we got his drain out and they added aome opiates to his pain managment system. (He is also on gaba every 8 hours, trazadone every 8 hours, carprofen every 12 hours, and an antibiotic once every 24 hours.) His opiate is codiene and after anothwr call with them today and a video of him screaming they told us to move his dose from every 8 hours to every 6 hours.

      Well were mid gaba and codiene, his carpeofen needs to reup in the next hour, and he just had his worse bout of screaming yet. At first it seemed like the codiene was helping but it seems to be getting worse again and were feeling super desperate, as watching him scream is about the worst thing ever. Any help would be appreciated.

      Reply
      • Rayla, initial blocks are usually temporary. The fact that you can view the site and comment here, proves you have not been permanently blocked. You can use the Remember Password link on the log-in page, or contact us with your username (or registered email address) and we can reset your password for you.

        Start here for help finding the many Tripawds Resources or call the toll-free Helpline anytime!

  181. Thank you for this information. Still praying that we will not need it, tho. We didn’t realize Jerry had 17 months Tripawd before mets happened. We are almost to 10 months. Mom and I pray for Spirit Jerry when we say our gratitude prayers. Thank you for all you do for us Tripawds. Love THURSTON

    Reply
    • Awwww Thurston and Gloria, you make our hearts so happy. And we pray that Thurston continues rockin’ and rollin’ on three for many, many more good times! We love you guys.

      Reply
  182. Thanks for the informative interview.
    Curious why cats tend to do better and live longer than dogs woth bone tumors.
    Seems like Metronomics is still “worth a try” under the parameters Dr Sequin discussed. Jerry certainly would agree based on the extended bonus time he got

    Sally and Alumni Happy Hannah and Merry Myrtle and Frankie too

    Reply
    • You are so welcome! I don’t have an answer to your question about cats, but assume it’s because they have nine lives? ;0 And yah we and Spirit Jerry agree metronomics is worth a try if it’s in someone’s ability to provide it for their animal.

      Reply
  183. Do you let your tripawd jump out of the car by himself? I always worry that it’s too much stress on the one remaining front leg by my three legged golden retriever wants no part of me helping him out.

    Reply
    • No, we would never allow that, nor to jump up in, regardless of which leg is missing. Such high impact on single remaining limbs will cause damage over time, and can cause immediate injury. Use a harness to help your dog down. Use positive reinforcement and whatever training methods which work for your dog.

      Reply
  184. Thanks so much for sharing your story. We are about to go through a THR with our tripawd buddy. He’s older than Murphy but still has a lot of “want to”. Seeing the videos you posted encourage us as well as give us a realistic timeframe to know what to expect when. I think we have the basics figured out. Lots of rugs around to keep him from slipping. Really good vet and rehab folks in waiting. Some boredombuster ideas.
    Is there anything that you can think of after the fact that you wished you’d thought of earlier or anything acquired wisdom that you can share now? Thansk!

    Reply
    • Great questions! If Kathi doesn’t see this please post in the Forums where we can help you and your boy OK? Best wishes to you both, and cheers for a speedy recovery.

      Reply
  185. Wonderful article – the seroma drainage was by far the most stressful and terrifying part of recovery for us! Thanks to you guys, we realized it was completely normal and found the best ways to care for our girl and keep her comfy 🙂

    Reply
  186. Exactly one year since last I wrote. Two years tomorrow that my boy is gone. And two weeks ago I said goodbye to Koko, my Siamese cat, who was Connor’s “brother” and my main support after he left us. It was hard to say goodbye to the greatest kitty I’ve ever known and loved, but he had a long and wonderful life, and while I miss him, the loss is nothing like what I felt when I lost my six year old dog, the closest thing I will ever have to a child. My Con was so young, and taken too early. After two years, I am finally able to talk about my boy without breaking down. I still think of him every day, still hold him close in my dreams, and tonight and tomorrow I will spend some time looking at photos and letters and emails, and remembering…love you my baby, Mama loves you so much.

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  187. Wyatt Ray!!! You sure do know how to keep a secret!!!!
    And, as usual, you are the the RockStar Celebrity of the “how to” video And the best part of the video (from your perspective), is you w1ere getting treats tossed uour way! You trained your hoomans si well….everytime you wiggled, you got a treat! You are such a smart voy!

    I’m sorry the injection didn’t work as well as hoped. But I’m soooo glad that you appear to see the cart as your friend! You certainly look happy in the photos. And I’m sure Ausrin Ray was glad to get rid of it!

    My illusion is that you had to stand and stay still a lot for the proper fittings. I can’t imagine the restraint you showed as all these “trial and error” details were worked out. Then again, maybe they had a treat bag tied around your collar

    The tips from Dr. Kramer were informative. I’m glad she was able to help you with proper fitting, usage, etc.
    Wyatt, we are all so happy that you have a tool to help you continue to be YOU! And goodness knows, you have two hoomans who will do whatever it takes to keep you being you❤

    Keep us posted Wyatt! Video next!!!
    Love
    Sally and Alumni Happy Hannah and Merry Myrtle and Frankie too!

    Reply
    • Thanks Michelle & Sally! We’re glad you found it useful, as Dr. Kramer’s tips are applicable to four-leggers as well.

      Yeah you guessed it Sally, Wyatt ate WAY too much that day as we bribed him through the fitting and trial and error process. Now that we have it down we will be making some videos to share so stay tuned.

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  188. In your description of the Ruff Wear Webmaster, you state, “Most people find it works well for their front or left leg amputee,…”. Does that mean it does not work for right rear amputees, or is that just a typo? My foster dog is a recent right rear amputee and, before reading your arricle, I had been very interested in the Webmaster for him after he heals.

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    • The Web Master works very well for any front or rear leg Tripawd. Where did you see that quote Ann? It clearly isn’t in this blog post where you commented.

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  189. This is such a fascinating interview! Thanks for Sharing. rhis woth us. And thanks to Dr Cahalane for all she is doing to raise awareness in her profession.

    The questions proposed brought out so much insight. Good job!!!!

    I love the way they embrace their dogs as family members without hesitation and without apology, jncluding how they handle their “funeral”, as well as overseeing their cremations. And having dogs enjoy their dining experience with their humans in restaurants, sweet!!!

    Looking forward to the next installment.

    Gratefully,
    Sally and Alumni Happy Hannah and Merry Myrtle and Frankie too!

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  190. That’s really interesting, thanks! It is actually so good to hear other positive stories from around the world and not just the horror stories of countries where animal neglect and abuse is still the norm. I also always find it hugely fascinating how not just the way we treat and see our pets differ from country to country but also how veterinary norms and treatments differ.
    thanks
    tina

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    • I’m glad you enjoyed it Tina! Global members like you are the inspawration behind getting more perspectives from non-US vets. Perhaps it’s time for us to talk to a Germany-based vet? If you have one you think would make a good guest on the show, please let us know.

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  191. oh darn…no cats huh. Probably don’t have room on the bed….and one of the cats is named Pepper!! Here is hoping the sweet boy finds his warm spot soon….he will miss the snow tho

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  192. Well. Thank you VERY much for all of this, as I picked up one of my dogs (I have four) from the vet today. She is a 7 yr old GSD and she too had amputation yesterday morning. They removed all of her left hind leg due the horrid, all too common cancer we suffer in our world. I feel much calmer inside after reading all of these posts and will head to your forums next. Thank you again, so very much for all of this sharing! Happy New Year to everyone. =)

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  193. Such a lovely way to express this journey And yes, the lessons learned are powerful indeed.
    Mr Jerry’s life lessons need to be a part of our daily meditation or empowering thoughts, etc. You’re a wise boy Jerry!!

    And Wyatt Ray, you look quite dashing in uoir Santa hat. And your Mom looks quite adorable in her hat. And your Dad looks quite…er…well….let’s just say that he wears that very unique Nelson tee quite well!

    The very best wishes for health and happiness back atcha’!

    Love always❤
    Sally and Alumni Happy Hannah and Merry Myrtle and Frankie too!

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  194. Hoppy New Year. Thanks for being here when we need you. Wishing you the best 2019 possible. <3 the picture

    xoxoxo
    Michelle & Angel Sassy

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  195. My 12 yr old pittie boy had his right rear back right leg amputated. The stitches were not done correctly and look to be coming off. I sent pic to place he got it done and they want hom to come in and get it re checked. This will be his 2nd day since surgery. He is in so much pain from stitches, he yelps and crys getting up. He is on all his meds. I tried carrying him but is just too much for me. My hisband wrks all day and i have a 3 yr old smar baby. My question is how can i help him pee? Or poop for that matter? How much longer will hos recovery period be? Which harness may I buy?

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  196. That picture is my girl Applesauce. I sadly lost her a month ago. She was 21 months post diagnosis for osteosarcoma and also a malignant melanoma under her tongue. Post 18 months amputation. We did hydrotherapy and cold laser and acupuncture every two weeks for the past 1.5 years and it helped her immensely. As well as supplements, herbs and CBD oil. She loved to swim and walks and playing. She made it to 11.5 years, almost 12. My heart is broken ❤️

    Reply
    • Oh Nancy! I’m so sorry to hear that. Applesauce really spoke to me when I was searching for photos of beautiful senior dogs. My heart goes out to you. She had such a great life thanks to you, and I’m sure that her spirit is with you in so many ways. Please know you are always welcome to talk with us in Coping with Loss. We want to be there for you so hop on over OK? (((hugs))))

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  197. My dog Maggie had her rear leg amputated 2 yrs ago. There is still an open wound. My vet said it will never heal because the bone keeps popping out of the skin. She also just told me a week ago that she had MRSA probably from the surgery. Is irt common yo have a none healing wound? Are we in danger of getting MRSA?

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  198. I have a 3 legged dog, german Shepard akbash mix and hes struggling to use his back 1 leg at all. Any idea or tips to help me get him up on it to even start using it?

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    • Yes. Please consult with a certified rehab therapist for a professional evaluation, treatment recommendations and exercises you can do at home to keep your pup fit and strong. Visit a CCRP or CCRT and the Tripawds Foundation will even pay for your first visit from the Maggie Moo Fund for Tripawd Rehab! For help finding the mant Tripawds resources and assistance programs, start here.

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    • And same to you Holly, Purrkins, Saxton & Mark! The word “thankful” barely scratches the surface of the gratitude we have for all you do here. THANK YOU SO MUCH!

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  199. My Jaxson is 9 years old and very active. Playful, loves to run, hike and jump fences. He had osteosarcoma in his leg and was in very severe pain. But he just had surgery 3 days ago, amputating his rear right leg. He still has not started using his other rear leg or even putting weight on it. He acts as tho he can’t even feel anything back there. He even drags his butt sometimes. When we take him outside, in a sling, he just drags the leg. He went a long time before having the amputation. I would think he had enough strength to pick his back end up, but no. Is this normal? It sure does not seem that way at all. Maybe we are being too pushy? Trying to see results too quickly? He even seems discouraged and depressed. We are seeing the vet today about this issue. Just thought I’d get a little advice from someone who has been they this. Please, I’d love to hear any experiences. ❤️

    Reply
    • Best wishes for Jaxson. Every dog’s recovery is different, and overdoing it too soon can certainly cause mobility issues. Confinemnt and moderation are key to a speedy recovery, and proper rehab is important. You will find plenty of tips in the Tripawds e-books or by searching the blogs and forums. And you can call the toll-free Tripawds Helpline anytime! Start here for help finding the many Tripawds resources.

      Our best advice is to consult with a certified rehab vet/tech for an orthopedic evaluation, treatment recommendations and strengthening exercises you can do at home. Visit a CCRT or CCCRP and the Tripawds Foundation can even pay for your first visit from the Maggie Moo Fund for Tripawd Rehab!

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  200. I am fostering a 5 year old dobe that was hit by a car last year. The rescue tried several surgeries to save the leg but we lost that battle last week. She has had a year to get used to having only three good legs but the amputation has definitely been a change. Any tips on how to help a big dog relearn how to get up, get around and how to potty will be greatly appreciated.

    Reply
    • You will find many helpful rehab tips and videos by searching the blogs and forums, or save time by downloading Loving Life on Three Legs. The absolute best recommendation is to consult with a certified rehab therapist for an orthopedic evaluation, treatment recommendations and strengthening exercises you can do at home. Visit a CCRT or CCCRP and the Tripawds Foundation can even pay for your first visit from the Maggie Moo Fund for Tripawd Rehab!

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  201. My three year old Maltese was hit by a school bus and lost his leg because of it. He is taking pain medication as he had surgery just five days ago. I know the medicine makes them sleepy but he hardly wants to get out of his kennel. He has only slept in it a night, otherwise he has gone with me everywhere. Now that’s the only place he wants to be. Is this normal? When should I be concerned? Do you think he’s ok?

    Reply
    • Hi coopersmom, sorry to hear about your pup but so glad that he survived the accident! Five days isn’t a long time after surgery but if he is behaving oddly I would ask your vet to adjust his pain medication. He may need more or less, but what you are describing sounds like he isn’t getting enough. Also please consider joining our Discussion Forums for more insight from the community. See you there!

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  202. Darling Wyatt, you sure are a Wonder Dawg!! You know no limits my friend!! You really had your Mum and Dad scared though!!! Thank goodness there is no surgery in your future!!! Keep keeping well my darling boy!
    Hugs and love all around ♥️ ♥️ ♥️

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  203. WOW WYATT!!! Having to go from skydiving to couch surfing……..BOOOORING!!!! And jaci g to go through the indignities of poking and prodding, pulling and stretching, at the hands of Vets! Poor baby!!

    Thanks so much for chronicling every thing Wyatt has been going through to get to this point. Most importantly, really, really glad to know that some scary things have been eliminated.

    Sharing your game plan and why is really helpful. Unfortunately, what Wyatt is going through is what a lot of Tripawds will face. The fact that Wyatt has made it all these years without any “horrible” issues, is quite a testament to the care tjat handsome boy has received from you two.

    I’m coming back to click on the link about the injection. Sounds interesting. Did you feel like the injection had a fairly immediate noticeable result?

    Looking forward to more follow-up blogs AND pictures of Mr Handsome!

    Hugs
    Sally and Alumni Happy Hannah and Merry Myrtle and Frankie too!

    Reply
    • Thanks Sally, I knew you would understand how hard it is for me to do this healing thing!

      Mom says “Thank you!” for saying she and Dad do a good job keeping me strong. And she says it took about a week before she could see that the surgery was going to help. In some instances it takes longer. but she’s gonna write more about that next week.

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  204. Awww Wyatt. It is heck getting older. I sure am glad your procedure worked for you. I know your mom & dad take really good care of you. I just started giving Bosch adaquin injections for arthritis last week. So far seem to be ok with it.

    hugs
    Michelle & Angel Sassy

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  205. Wow. Wyatt Ray my Mac has chronic arthritis. We’ve only ever been given drugs to manage it – Metacam & Amantadine. I apply common sense & keep control of his weight and admit I have worried over “what’s enough exercise” for a tripawd with chronic arthritis. We’re today at the 11 weeks mark of amputation and half way through his chemo. I over worry about his capabilities but fret if we do damage the vets will insist on euthanasia. He tore his ccl last year which I think is what triggered the osteosarcoma (it’s been suggested by my vet), and was told he will probably do the other leg too (which is now his only hind leg). I asked about physio and got told nope, as “wouldn’t have amputated if didn’t think other leg would cope”. Looking forward to reading more about your journey. Thanks guys for posting!! Kerry & Mac

    Reply
    • Kerry, you are a great pet parent. Thanks for sharing Mac’s story with us! And 3-paws up to you for remaining so vigilant about his activity. Yes, we have heard of cruciate repair hardware being a potential source of osteosarcoma, that link has been discussed for some time. As for physio, we really encourage you to visit a physio therapist on your own if your veterinarian isn’t supportive. ALL dogs can benefit from an evaluation, and especially three-legged ones. There are still some vets who aren’t familiar with the benefits of physio, so please reach out to one to help Mac live a long, happy life on three. If you aren’t sure where to start, join our discussion forums and we can help you find one.

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  206. She’s absolutely beautiful! My tripawd GSD Angie lost her left hind leg at four months of age also-we adopted her from the SPCA at seven months-she can do everything her four-legged brother can do & she runs the house!

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  207. BEAUTIFUL STORY!!! BEAUTIFUL DOGGY!! BEAUTIFUL HOOMAN SOUL!!!❤❤❤❤

    Clearly Aksel Rose was born to be on this journey with Katherine….and vice versa!! The bond is delightful! Such exquisite care too!

    Thanks for sharing these two precious Souls with us…..and the wonderful photps!

    Hugs
    Sally and Alumni Happy Hannah and Merry Myrtle and Frankie too!

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  208. Thank you so much for this beautiful post honoring Hiroaki. We both are still struggling to fully accept that he is gone. It has been 2 of the longest weeks of our lives but we have to go on for us, his sisters and his memory. I see signs of my little boy everywhere.

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    • Paw shucks, it’s the least we could do for being introduced to such an amazing kitty. How wonderful his energetic presence is so strong in your life. We have no doubt it will continue. Much love & hugs to the pride.

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  209. I was not quite ready for this story and am sitting here completely choked up with tears in my eyes. What a beautiful story, I am so grateful to have found this site.

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  210. I’d like very nuch to get these for my cat who struggles the same way. He’s a large cat, which doesn’t help. He became a tripawd in June of this year, taking his back leg.

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  211. PS Okay, a bit blurry eyed over here too with that video. If only our dogs and cats could live with us eight up to tje day we transition, and then go with us into the next dimension.

    WOW! Talk about a life well loved and well loved! That Jerry enjoyed every moment veing with you!! That boy had a fun filled life!!

    I loved the tug of war part of the video. He was NOT giving up! And playing ball with Jim and bumping tje ball right back to him with great precision..BRILLIANT!!

    And hearing his bark again, his splashy sounds as he frolic in the water…..PRICELESS!

    Beautiful tribute

    Reply
    • We are glad you enjoyed the video, Sally! Yeah, it brought back lots of good times with that dog. Giving him the adventures he so patiently waited for all his life was the least we could do to pay him back for all he did to help us be more grounded human beings.

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  212. Yes, I agree with PETRA. We HAVE gotten to meet Jerry. It’s not “just” through the great pictures that tell his story or the fantastic banners that you share with us. Nope, that’s just part of his LIVING LEGACY.

    That “Wise Sage” continues to live on through you and continues his Soul’s Purpose through your Soul’s Purpose. Not “happenstance” at all. Destiny, guided, divinely driven, reunion of Soul’s…whatever you want to call it, JIM, RENE AND JERRY came together at this time to teach us all soooo many life lessons.

    And of course, let’s not overlook the lives of dogs and cats all over the world who have been given extended quality time because of the “little blog” you started ten years ago. And for those tragic cases where little, or no extended time is given, we are able to reach out with love and support that can only been found here from those who understand the journey like no others can.

    Jerry and his humans created a “Universe of Love” where there is no judgement, no right or wrong. There is an acceptance and support given to each individual for whatever “forced choice” they need to make.

    We all come together here because of our unbreakable bonds with our dogs and cats. Make no mistake about it, the bonds we form with each other are just as deep and just as unbreakable. Regardless of age, race, skinny, fat, differing political views, rich, poor, etc….LOVE brings us together and LOVE is what unites us and makes our hearts all beat in harmony as one.

    Yes, the lessons Jerry taught us, and continues to teach us, are timeless.

    When Jerry picked you, he knew you would understand his journey is more than “just” about thriving on three legs. His message of love and acceptance resonates through you two every single day.

    Thank you. Thank you.

    Love and light
    Sally and Alumni Happy Hannah and Merry Myrtle and Frankie too!

    Reply
    • Sally, your way with words is beyond anything I could ever write. You speak from the heart, with unmatched wisdom. Thank you for your kind words and taking time to honor Jerry’s life. Truthfully, all of what you see here is because of what he taught us, and all the lessons and love that followed through the wonderful people like yourself that he has brought here. Making Tripawds a judgement-free, pure love and support zone, is what we owe him and all the animals in this world who are unburdened by the human brain. We are honored to be paying back that debt through this community, with so much help from loving, brilliant people who happen to find themselves here because of a dreaded disease, accident or other reason. Thank you thank you for allowing us to continue paying it forward. xoxoxo

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  213. You have paid tribute to Fran beautifully!! Every single word was so heartfelt. Lovely, an absolutely lovely expression of your relatuonship with Fran. ❤ You gave us such a vivid portrait of what a special Soul Fran is!!

    He must ve bragging non stop at the Bridge about what a great time he had with you while in his earth clothes! Fran got to know what it felt like to be loved and spoiled and no dog could ask for anything more. And the love you filled him with will stay with him forever. And make no mistake, the love he filled you with will stay with your forever❤

    Thank you sooo much for allowing us the privilege of getting to know this amazing Warrior with the “goofiest” face and the best snorer of all time!

    Love and hugs
    Sally and Alumni Happy Hannah and Merry Myrtle and Frankie too!

    PS When Fran was welcomed back home at the Rainbow Bridge, he was greet with a wheelbarrow full of purple toys!

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  214. LOVE you Jerry! Now and furever. We will be eternally grateful to you for inspiring your pawrents to create such a wonderful resource and loving community! We were all so sad to lose you but we know you were needed over the bridge because they didn’t have a CFO until you showed up!!

    xoxo,
    Codie Rae and the Oaktown Pack

    Reply
    • Love you back CR & the pack. We couldn’t do Tripawds without your love and support. And we love the thought of Jerry G. Dawg, Rainbow Bridge CFO. Thank you!

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  215. Jim and Rene, we got to meet a beautiful soul named JERRY through the two of you! I have watched his 10 year tribute video and even though I never got to meet Jerry, I cried tears for you both… it is obvious as to how much you love and miss your boy still, you have captured some beautiful moments that will be with you furever!
    Thank you Jerry for being the special soul that you are and special thanks to both of you for giving your life to Tripawds and all of us who have needed the support.
    Stewie is thriving on 3 and we never would have imagined it possible, but for Tripawds.com! Thank you!!
    Lots of love from Super Stu and his ever loving Pack
    xxxxxxx

    Reply
    • Petra, we so appreciate your beautiful note and loving words, thank you. It’s almost like you have met him, because you embody the spirit of Be More Dog. Each time we look at Stewie we are amazed and so grateful that you and Paul took that brave step into Tripawdland. You are all a great example of what is possible on three legs for a giant breed dog. What a joy and honor to have met all of you!

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