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The Impact of Amputation on Dogs and Cats, Tuesday May 2 2017 1pm Eastern | Tripawd Talk Radio

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The Impact of Amputation on Dogs and Cats, Tuesday May 2 2017 1pm Eastern
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The Rainbow Bridge

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24 April 2017 - 10:48 am
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Join us for a live Tripawd Talk Radio with Dr. Denis J. Marcellin-Little, DVM, Diplomate ACVS, VSMR and Professor of Orthopedic Surgery at North Carolina State University. This amazing surgeon is world famous for orthopedic breakthroughs in animals such as the first total knee replacement in a cat.

On this fascinating show we'll discuss amputation as a concept, amputation of a front leg versus the back leg, amputation in puppies and how to help amputees through the use of Dr. Marcellin-Little's technology and prosthetic limbs. You can listen live here:

Impact of Amputation on Dogs and Cats, Perspectives from a Veterinary Orthopedic Surgeon

Do you have a question for Dr. Marcellin-Little? If you have one specific question about orthopedic challenges for Tripawd cats or dogs, we want to hear from you. Please post your question below no later than this Friday, April 28 at 3pm Eastern. Thanks!

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Germany
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25 April 2017 - 8:51 am
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That sounds really interesting!! thanks!

I would love to get an orthopedic opinion on:

Apart from doing core strengthening exercises and physio therapy, is there anything I can do to maintain the health of the remaining leg? What does the Orthopedic Surgeon say to supplements?

(ok, that was two questions, sorry 🙂 )

thanks!!

tina

Guardian of Manni the Wonderdog. -Or is it the other way 'round?

Manni was diagnosed with osteosarcoma in Dec '15 and immediately had his right front leg amputated, followed by 5 rounds of chemo. Manni's real name is Manfred and he turns 10 on Jan 28 2017. So far we are mets-free...

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3 May 2017 - 4:07 am
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That was really interesting!! Thank you! And thank you for putting my questions forth! 

Very interesting was the issue of the lacking Standard of Care and 'checklist'. Today it really is a matter of which vet or clinic you happen to end up with. 

I was actually offered limb sparing surgery as a theoretical option for Manni. They would have used an implant, which they would have shipped from the States. It wasn't really an option for me then because I have had orthopedists for humans tell me (in regard to my spine) to stay away from any artificial implants as the long term effects of these were not known and anything artificial will always stay just that for a body and may cause other critical issues such as inflammation. I think there is also a problem with still getting clean margins for osteo. I guess it will be a lot more standard in a decade. And yes, I still wish we could have saved Manni's leg, though. 

Interesting also, because I never thought about it before, is how different breeds are differently affected by amputation. At the same time though, it's kind of scary how this also goes for rehab. Basically this means that a rehab person has to be SO extremely specialized it feels almost impossible. 

The supplement issue was also -while a little disheartening- very interesting. 

So thank you, Rene and Jim! And everybody else: listen to that episode! 😊

tina & Manni

Guardian of Manni the Wonderdog. -Or is it the other way 'round?

Manni was diagnosed with osteosarcoma in Dec '15 and immediately had his right front leg amputated, followed by 5 rounds of chemo. Manni's real name is Manfred and he turns 10 on Jan 28 2017. So far we are mets-free...

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3 May 2017 - 6:47 am
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Is this archived somewhere? 

Germany
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3 May 2017 - 7:13 am
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The headline in the original post ist linked to the audio file ('Impact of Amputation...') just click on that. 

Guardian of Manni the Wonderdog. -Or is it the other way 'round?

Manni was diagnosed with osteosarcoma in Dec '15 and immediately had his right front leg amputated, followed by 5 rounds of chemo. Manni's real name is Manfred and he turns 10 on Jan 28 2017. So far we are mets-free...

Michigan
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3 May 2017 - 7:29 am
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charliebear said
Is this archived somewhere?   

Impact of Amputation on Dogs and Cats, Perspectives from a Veterinary Orthopedic Surgeon

Hit the link;) It is a very informative interview! A little disheartening too! 

We were never even given the option of limb sparing, Purrkins STS was on his carpus. I know we got huge clean margins and that is awesome but I do have concerns for the future.

Is it because he is a cat and lower to the ground less concern? They make wheelchairs for back leg amputees for cats, I haven't seen one for front leg amps. I see them for dogs. Purrkins could not use a wheelchair now anyway he is too active!

But I do hope as he ages we have options to assist him more if needed. Other then the things we already know less weight & core strength.

It's hard for me to wrap my head around that we have all these resources and tools for dogs and not cats? The University gave us zero information after his amp! That needs to be changed!

I love this surgeon did a knee replacement on a kitty. I just wish there was a standard care for both cats and dogs.

That kitties did not always fall into 2 nd place. Just saying;) 

Thanks for asking about the kitties Rene!heart

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3 May 2017 - 7:37 am
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Holly, that actually did cross my mind when listening to it. But maybe the resources are there and the clinics just don't spread them enough? I never got any more info after the amputation either about anything, really. 

And there we are with the missing stand of care again. 

I understand how you feel.  Maybe it's also because dogs are more comparable to humans than cats and that's why they use dogs for comparative data for human treatments? I can imagine that maybe that's why there are maybe more options for dogs. Not that that is fair.

tina 

Guardian of Manni the Wonderdog. -Or is it the other way 'round?

Manni was diagnosed with osteosarcoma in Dec '15 and immediately had his right front leg amputated, followed by 5 rounds of chemo. Manni's real name is Manfred and he turns 10 on Jan 28 2017. So far we are mets-free...

Michigan
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3 May 2017 - 7:48 am
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tinsch said
But maybe the resources are there and the clinics just don't spread them enough? I never got any more info after the amputation either about anything, really. 

And there we are with the missing stand of care again. 

I understand how you feel.  Maybe it's also because dogs are more comparable to humans than cats and that's why they use dogs for comparative data for human treatments? I can imagine that maybe that's why there are maybe more options for dogs. Not that that is fair.

tina   

Thanks for seeing it too Tina! Good question Tina! I am going to ask when we go back in July! I found out later the university does do rehabilitation for cats who have been injured & have all their limbs! SOOOO why was it not even offered to us. I will let you know what we find out. I am going to advocate for kitties, will see how far I get . I just think some things should change as I believe we all do for dogs and kitties. We amputate and send us home saying good luck ! I know that is what this site is for and thank god for that. 

heart

I also want to add, the surgeon must not own a kitty ? Purrkins does more then just get in his litter box and his bed;) I do everything in my power to protect his limbs with steps etc. There is a rare occasion when I am powerless to do so! This morning Purrkins got on the counter to help himself to some bonito flakes ! I heard the bag and assumed wrongly, it was his brother. I went out to the kitchen sure enough its Purrkins and as soon as I went in the kitchen he knew he was in trouble & jumped down from the counter! oh-my NIGHTMARE all that force on his front leg , cats are harder to control in some aspects! I normally have Bonito flakes in a locked cupboard & block the kitchen off when I am not around. Never underestimate a tripawd kitty! He thinks he can still do all things on 3 legs!

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3 May 2017 - 10:39 am
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Hey I love that y'all were listening, thank you so much.

This was one of our most interesting and helpful episodes to date. I would like to find a transcriber to put it into text form so we can all re-read his information. Anyone know a good transcriber?

Meanwhile, here's what I know about veterinary medicine's history with cats and dogs. First, I totally understand why cat parents feel like second class citizens in many cases. I would too! But to be fair to vets, there just isn't enough information and studies out there about feline veterinary care --- yet. Vet medicine is a relatively new science. Developments in medicine started with agricultural animals, moved on to dogs and only as recently as the 1970s did vets start studying cats. Until then, cats were viewed as feral strays by the general population and most people had no idea cats could even make awesome domestic pets. At least that's  how I understand it, correct me if I'm wrong.

I agree Holly, in many respects cats are much harder to control than dogs! That's a big reason why felines aren't participating in too many clinical trials. They just aren't as willing to please as dogs....which is why we love cats right? Their pawesome independence and attitude! 🙂  So yeah, when he said that in general we have "lowered expectations" for physical mobility in cats, I can sort of see his point because cats are mostly indoor creatures, as opposed to the romping, jumpy and energetic wild nature of dogs. But that's neither here nor there, I too would LOVE to see more information about cats and rehab therapy, mobility studies, prosthetic developments, etc.

Later when I asked Dr. Marcelin-Little off-air, "Why don't more vets give clients all the options before amputation?' he told me that "Progress is slow. But more are learning. We're getting there." I believe that 100 pawcent.

Stay tuned, I'll have the interview in a blog post soon.

It's better to hop on three legs than to limp on four.™
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3 May 2017 - 2:39 pm
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It's difficult for animal researchers to do their research on cats because of cats' willingness to participate and to be consistent. You know what its like to herd cats.

The general public does not spend as much money on cats as they do on their dogs. Fewer people take cats in for annual checkups than do dog parents. I hate to say it, but you'll find there are many more cats than dogs at shelters and generally cats are free. I wonder if this makes them seem less valuable.

I suspect that there would be fewer studies on cats for these reasons and somebody has to see an eventual opportunity to make money from pharmaceuticals, rehab, carts, etc.

Kerren 

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